phonology

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pho·net·ics

(fō-net'iks),
The science of speech and of pronunciation.
Synonym(s): phonology

phonology

/pho·nol·o·gy/ (fah-nol´ah-je) the science of vocal sounds.phonolog´ical

phonology

[fōnol′əjē]
the study of speech sounds, particularly the principles governing the way speech sounds are used in a given language.

phonology

(fo-nol'o-je) [ phono- + -logy]
The study of the speech sounds of a particular language at a particular time or place (e.g., 17th-century Mexican Spanish).
See: phonetics
References in periodicals archive ?
The results of the present study indicate that a phonologically based reading instruction program delivered in small groups (3-5) can significantly impact the phonetic and word-level reading skills as well as the reading comprehension skills of deficient readers in first through sixth grade.
The answer must be that there is nothing phonologically implausible about such a solution which, in fact, is attested elsewhere.
The reading treatment was phonologically driven and always began with the spoken word, in contrast to most reading instruction, which begins with the written word.
Indeed, all the phrases in (24) carry a person marker, phonologically overt or not, suggesting that these particles attach to already established morphological words.
Kiparsky's account also makes the interesting prediction that the syllable immediately following an initial syllable that has been phonologically beefed up through lengthening may potentially (depending on one's interpretation of the relationship between foot structures and stress) carry secondary stress since it belongs to a different foot from the first syllable.
phonologically predictable) before a following *u; cf.
6) However, partitive singular -d cannot be regarded as a phonologically conditioned variant of -t, given that -t may occur in Q3 monosyllables.
As a rule, any word containing an affix, including semantically and phonologically quite transparent forms such as re- (pronounced [ri]), under- or over-, was coded according to its stem.
Secondary productivity, on the other hand, refers to the integration of words which have to be phonologically, semantically or syntactically adapted in order to meet the extramorphological properties of the class into which they are accepted.
But even this description overstates the amount of variation, as many of the choices are interdependent and nearly all are phonologically conditioned.
These four factors, each examined for their influence on the perception of stress placement in nonce words, are 1) the stress pattern of a known word similar phonetically and phonologically to the nonce word, 2) syllable weight, 3) a subregularity in the lexicon, and 4) the morphological category of the word.
No phonologically comparable diminutive process is found in Classical evidence or reported for the other major dialect groups, so diminution and nominalization by rhotacization cannot be assigned to "Common Chinese" as I have defined it, only to the Northern group.