phobia


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phobia

 [fo´be-ah]
a persistent, irrational, intense fear of a specific object, activity, or situation (the phobic stimulus), fear that is recognized as being excessive or unreasonable by the individual himself. When a phobia is a significant source of distress or interferes with social functioning, it is considered a mental disorder (sometimes called a phobic disorder). Some typical phobias are: acrophobia (fear of heights), astraphobia (fear of lightning), cenotophobia (fear of new things or new ideas), claustrophobia (fear of closed places), hemophobia (fear of blood), and xenophobia (dread of strangers). Phobias are subclassified as agoraphobia, social phobias, and specific phobias. See also anxiety disorders. adj., adj pho´bic.
simple phobia specific phobia.
social phobia an anxiety disorder characterized by fear and avoidance of social or performance situations in which the individual fears possible embarrassment and humiliation, for example, fear of speaking, performing, or eating in public.
specific phobia an anxiety disorder characterized by persistent and excessive or unreasonable fear of a circumscribed, well-defined object or situation, in contrast to fear of being alone or of public places (agoraphobia) or fear of embarrassment in social situations (social phobia). Common specific phobias involve fear of animals, particularly dogs, snakes, insects, and mice; fear of closed spaces (claustrophobia); and fear of heights (acrophobia).

pho·bi·a

(fō'bē-ă),
Any objectively unfounded morbid dread or fear that arouses a state of panic. The word is used as a combining form in many terms expressing the object that inspires the fear.
[G. phobos, fear]

phobia

/pho·bia/ (fo´be-ah) a persistent, irrational, intense fear of a specific object, activity, or situation (the phobic stimulus), fear that is recognized as being excessive or unreasonable by the individual himself. When a phobia is a significant source of distress or interferes with social functioning, it is considered a mental disorder (sometimes called a phobic disorder ); in DSM-IV phobias are classified with the anxiety disorders and are subclassified as agoraphobia, specific phobias, and social phobias.pho´bic
simple phobia  specific p.
social phobia  an anxiety disorder characterized by fear and avoidance of social or performance situations in which the individual fears possible embarrassment and humiliation.
specific phobia  persistent and excessive or unreasonable fear of a circumscribed, well-defined object or situation.

phobia

(fō′bē-ə)
n.
1. A persistent, abnormal, and irrational fear of a specific thing or situation that compels one to avoid it, despite the awareness and reassurance that it is not dangerous.
2. A strong fear, dislike, or aversion.

phobia

[fō′bē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, phobos, fear
an obsessive, irrational, and intense fear of a specific object, such as an animal or dirt; of an activity, such as meeting strangers or leaving the familiar setting of the home; or of a physical situation, such as heights and open or closed spaces. Typical manifestations of phobia include faintness, fatigue, palpitations, perspiration, nausea, tremor, and panic. Some kinds of phobias are agoraphobia, algophobia, claustrophobia, erythrophobia, gynephobia, lalophobia, mysophobia, nyctophobia, photophobia, xenophobia, and zoophobia. Also called phobic anxiety, phobic disorder, phobic reaction. Compare compulsion. See also simple phobia, social phobia. phobic, adj.

phobia

Greek, πηοβοσ, fear Psychiatry An irrational fear or an objectively unfounded 'morbid' dread of an element in the environment or particular activity, of such intensity as to evoke anxiety, panic, and adverse physiologic effects, and compel its victim to avoid contact therewith at virtually any social cost; phobias may result from displacing an internal conflict to an external object symbolically related to the conflict Common phobias Achluophobia–darkness, agora–open spaces, ailuro–cats, algo–pain, andro– ♂, auto–solitude, batho–depths, claustro–closed spaces, cyno–dogs, demo–crowds, erythro–blushing; gyno–♀, hypno–sleep, myso–dirt/germs, pan–everything, pedo–children, xeno–strangers. See Agoraphobia, Cancer phobia, Displacement, Fever phobia, Homophobia, Monophobia, PAD syndrome, School phobia, Simple phobia, Social phobia.

pho·bi·a

(fō'bē-ă)
Any objectively unfounded morbid dread or fear that arouses a state of panic. The word is used as a combining form in many terms expressing the object that inspires the fear.
[G. phobos, fear]

phobia

An inappropriate, irrational or excessive fear of a particular object or situation, that interferes with normal life. Phobias may relate to many objects including reptiles or insects, open spaces or public places (agoraphobia), crowds, public speaking, performing or even eating in public and using public toilets. Exposure causes intense anxiety and sometimes a PANIC ATTACK. Treatment is by cognitive behaviour therapy.

Phobia

In psychoanalytic theory, a psychological defense against anxiety in which the patient displaces anxious feelings onto an external object, activity, or situation.

phobia,

n an intense, irrational, and obsessive fear of a particular object, activity, or situation such as animals, heights, meeting new people, or enclosed spaces.

pho·bi·a

(fō'bē-ă)
Any objectively unfounded morbid dread or fear that arouses a state of panic; used as a combining form in many terms expressing the object that inspires the fear.
[G. phobos, fear]

phobia (fō´bēə),

n a specific hysterical fear.
phobia, social,
n an anxiety disorder in which a person is afraid of social situations for fear of being judged unworthy by others.

phobia

an excessive or unreasonable fear of something.

Patient discussion about phobia

Q. what is phobia? well when you have scary to someone or something

A. A phobia is fear from something- an object, a person or a situation, that makes the person feel scared to face that certain situation, and even try and avoid it- for example- some people are scared of closed places ("agoraphobia")- they cannot sit at the cinema or at an elevator because of the fear of not being able to escape if needed. Some people have a social phobia and they cannot face a crowd, or perform in front of a crowd (some can't even speak out loud in front of other people).

Q. how to treat my social phobia?

A. there is a protocol for treating any kinds of phobias. it requires time and a psychologist. it's consisted of learning relaxation methods and doing everything in small steps until you can handle your phobia.

Q. i feel huge tension when i am in close narrow environment , is it a phobia?

A. Yes, it may be considered a phobia, or more specifically situational type phobia. However, the important thing is whether is this fear reasonable? Do you think it's out of proportion? Phobia is a fear that one perceive as irrational and out of proportion and yet one feels and is affected adversely by it. If this fear is appropriate (e.g. fear of falling in mountain climbing) it's not a phobia.

You may read more about it http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/phobias.html

More discussions about phobia
References in periodicals archive ?
Aside from phobias of spiders or flying, having a social phobia makes it hard to interact with others out of fear of embarrassment, according to NIMH.
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However, psychologists point out that stress at home, such as parental separation, may be the underlying cause of school phobia.
Anna Valeri, a university student from Armenia explained that her phobia from insects goes back to her childhood.
There are other therapies used in phobia treatment, such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT).
6% whose parents considered them shy, also met the DSM-IV lifetime diagnostic criteria for social phobia.
Shyness writ large - which is what a social phobia basically is - can stop people simply speaking to people and forces them to avoid social situations.
Needle phobia is a complex set of different conditions that causes people to avoid medical needle procedures.
The client had been diligent in attempting a variety of therapies for most of that time, practising the use of typical phobia treatments such as systematic imaginal and in vivo exposure.
An irrational fear of green peas - a splinter fear of the more general phobia of vegetables, called lachanophobia.
Volunteers experienced something that frightened them and scientists then removed the memory of fear, so that when they were once more confronted by their phobia, they were as blas as George Clooney at a cocktail party.