pheromone

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pheromone

 [fer´o-mōn]
a substance secreted to the outside of the body and perceived (as by smell) by other individuals of the same species, releasing specific behavior in the percipient.

pher·o·mone

(fer'ō-mōn),
A type of ectohormone secreted by an individual and perceived by a second individual of the same or similar species, thereby producing a change in the sexual or social behavior of that individual. Compare: allelochemicals, allomone, kairomone.
[G. pherō, to carry, + hormaō, to excite, stimulate]

pheromone

/pher·o·mone/ (fer´ah-mōn) a substance secreted to the outside of the body and perceived (as by smell) by other individuals of the same species, releasing specific behavior in the percipient.

pheromone

(fĕr′ə-mōn′)
n.
A chemical secreted by an animal, especially an insect, that influences the behavior or physiology of others of the same species, as by attracting members of the opposite sex or marking the route to a food source.

pher′o·mon′al adj.

pheromone

[fer′əmōn′]
Etymology: Gk, pherein, to carry, hormaein, to stimulate
a substance secreted by an organism that elicits a particular response from another individual of the same species, usually of the opposite sex. Pheromones may be sexual stimulants or attractants or alarm or trail-making substances; in social insects they have a role in the determination of castes.

pheromone

A secreted or excreted chemical factor that triggers a social response in members of the same species, which fall into one of three broad categories:  alarm pheromones, food trail pheromones, and sex pheromones.

pheromone

An odorous body secretion that affects the behaviour of other individuals of the same species, acting as a sex attractant or in other ways. Pheromones are important in many animal species but, until recently, were thought to be unimportant in humans. It has now been shown, however, that the timing of ovulation in women can be controlled by pheromones from the armpit. This is believed to be the explanation of the fact that women living together will frequently develop synchronized menstrual cycles.

pheromone

a chemical substance used in communication between organisms of the same species. Pheromones are found mainly in animals, but they occur in some lower plant groups where a chemical is secreted into water by female gametes to attract male gametes. In animals, for example, pheromones are transmitted in the air, as in female emperor and eggar moths, which secrete a chemical that is attractive to males over large distances, or by a dog marking out his territory with urine. Insect pheromones have been used to trap females of serious pests.

pheromone

a substance secreted to the outside of the body and perceived (as by smell) by other individuals of the same species, releasing specific behavior in the percipient.
References in periodicals archive ?
fasciatus can detect a pheromonal stimulus, surprisingly, there was no differential response between self and conspecific stimuli.
Procurement Purchase Supply Pheromonal Lures, Panels Adhesives, Glues Forest Protection Activities
The qualitative differences or the complexity in the number of pheromonal components are key factors in attracting fruit fly females (Jang et al.
Despite this, there has been no detailed investigation into pheromone substances, both in their precise biochemical nature or pheromonal function.
We investigated the amphibian pheromonal system as a potential target of common environmental chemicals.
Male exposure could potentially alter male pheromone production and responsiveness, thereby altering the pheromonal and behavioral cues received by females.
This male pheromone polymorphism in Drosophila is also responsible for reproductive isolation between pheromonal races (Grillet et al.
Discrete subpopulations of neurons in the vomeronasal organ respond to discrete pheromonal signals (73), many of which are steroid metabolites (74,75).
Response of alder and willow to attack by tent caterpillars and webworms: Evidence for pheromonal sensitivity of willows.
halys seems to have suppressed pheromonal communication while relying more on pheromone cross-attraction to find the array of host plants required for optimal development.