pheromone

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pheromone

 [fer´o-mōn]
a substance secreted to the outside of the body and perceived (as by smell) by other individuals of the same species, releasing specific behavior in the percipient.

pher·o·mone

(fer'ō-mōn),
A type of ectohormone secreted by an individual and perceived by a second individual of the same or similar species, thereby producing a change in the sexual or social behavior of that individual. Compare: allelochemicals, allomone, kairomone.
[G. pherō, to carry, + hormaō, to excite, stimulate]

pheromone

/pher·o·mone/ (fer´ah-mōn) a substance secreted to the outside of the body and perceived (as by smell) by other individuals of the same species, releasing specific behavior in the percipient.

pheromone

(fĕr′ə-mōn′)
n.
A chemical secreted by an animal, especially an insect, that influences the behavior or physiology of others of the same species, as by attracting members of the opposite sex or marking the route to a food source.

pher′o·mon′al adj.

pheromone

[fer′əmōn′]
Etymology: Gk, pherein, to carry, hormaein, to stimulate
a substance secreted by an organism that elicits a particular response from another individual of the same species, usually of the opposite sex. Pheromones may be sexual stimulants or attractants or alarm or trail-making substances; in social insects they have a role in the determination of castes.

pheromone

A secreted or excreted chemical factor that triggers a social response in members of the same species, which fall into one of three broad categories:  alarm pheromones, food trail pheromones, and sex pheromones.

pheromone

An odorous body secretion that affects the behaviour of other individuals of the same species, acting as a sex attractant or in other ways. Pheromones are important in many animal species but, until recently, were thought to be unimportant in humans. It has now been shown, however, that the timing of ovulation in women can be controlled by pheromones from the armpit. This is believed to be the explanation of the fact that women living together will frequently develop synchronized menstrual cycles.

pheromone

a chemical substance used in communication between organisms of the same species. Pheromones are found mainly in animals, but they occur in some lower plant groups where a chemical is secreted into water by female gametes to attract male gametes. In animals, for example, pheromones are transmitted in the air, as in female emperor and eggar moths, which secrete a chemical that is attractive to males over large distances, or by a dog marking out his territory with urine. Insect pheromones have been used to trap females of serious pests.

pheromone

a substance secreted to the outside of the body and perceived (as by smell) by other individuals of the same species, releasing specific behavior in the percipient.
References in periodicals archive ?
2005) Pheromonal activity of compounds identified from male Phyllotreta cruciferae: field tests of racemic mixtures, pure enantiomers, and combination with allyl isothiocyanate.
Pheromonal markers as indicators of parasite load: parasite-mediated behavior in salamanders (Plethodon angusticlavius).
Among lizard pheromonal studies, one of the most widely studied species is the skink, Eumeces laticeps.
Males of all strains raised the tip of the abdomen with the everted rectal epithelium in the pheromonal calling position (Feron 1962) and all except blind males turned toward females when they passed nearby.
Pheromonal control of dealation and oogenesis in virgin queen fire ants.
This pheromonal model ensures that paths must be frequently reinforced to remain relevant [1].
In courtship, only pheromonal cues have been examined, so their importance relative to other stimuli in not known.
It is now time to move on and ask how pheromones take effect in humans," they add, "and how human pheromonal response may be involved in both healthy human behavior and .
Pherins, pheromonal chemicals that cause a response in the volmeronasal organ (VNO), can apparently affect the olfactory system even when the VNO is blocked.
At the same time our partners are less interested in us, because a healthy pheromonal smell is linked to a healthy immune system.
Although this is not to suggest that what is true for social insects should be true for rats, nor that reward odor or nonreward odor can be appropriately considered pheromonal, it is clear that in the animal world there is a correspondence between functional and physical properties of naturally occurring odorants.
cinereus to establish a territory by pheromonal marking: Jaeger 1981, 1984) by introducing the invader randomly into one of the four corners of the chamber.