phenol


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phenol

 [fe´nol]
1. an extremely poisonous compound, used in dilute solution as an antimicrobial, anesthetic, and antipruritic. Ingestion or absorption through the skin causes symptoms including colic, local irritation, corrosion, seizures, cardiac arrhythmias, shock, and respiratory arrest. Phenol should be properly labeled and stored to avoid accidental poisoning. Called also carbolic acid.
2. any of various related organic compounds containing one or more hydroxyl groups attached to an aromatic carbon ring.
phenol coefficient a measure of the bactericidal activity of a chemical compound in relation to phenol. The activity of the compound is expressed as the ratio of dilution in which it kills in 10 minutes but not in 5 minutes under the specified conditions. It can be determined in the absence of organic matter, or in the presence of a standard amount of added organic matter.

phe·nol

(fē'nol),
Hydroxybenzene; an antiseptic, anesthetic, and disinfectant; locally escharotic in concentrated form and neurolytic in 3-4% solutions; internally, a powerful escharotic poison.

phenol

/phe·nol/ (fe´nol)
1. an extremely poisonous compound, C6H5OH, which is caustic and disinfectant; used as a pharmaceutic preservative and in dilution as an antimicrobial and topical anesthetic and antipruritic. Poisoning, due to ingestion or transdermal absorption, causes symptoms including colic, local irritation, corrosion, seizures, cardiac arrhythmias, shock, and respiratory arrest.
Phenol.
2. any organic compound containing one or more hydroxyl groups attached to an aromatic carbon ring.

phenol

(fē′nôl′, -nōl′, -nŏl′)
n.
1. A caustic, poisonous, white crystalline compound, C6H6O, derived from benzene and used in resins, plastics, and pharmaceuticals and in dilute form as a disinfectant and antiseptic. Also called carbolic acid.
2. Any of a class of aromatic organic compounds having at least one hydroxyl group attached directly to the benzene ring.

phenol

[fē′nol]
Etymology: Gk, phainein, to appear; L, oleum, oil
2 any of a large number and variety of chemical products closely related in structure to the alcohols and containing a hydroxyl group attached to a benzene ring. The phenols are components of dyes, plastics, disinfectants, antimicrobials, and other drugs, including salicylic acid.

phenol

Nutrition Phenolics A simple cyclic compound with a hydroxyl group on an aromatic ring–eg, tyrosine; phenols are concentrated in fruits–grapes/raisins, garlic, onions, green tea, and may protect against cardiovascular disease, CA, possibly viruses Toxicology Carbolic acid, hydroxybenzene, phenyl hydrate A toxic crystalline compound, with a hydroxyl group on a benzene ring; phenol was once used as a topical anesthetic, antiseptic, and antipruritic

phenol

carbolic acid, C6H5OH, which has been used as an antiseptic and DISINFECTANT because of its antimicrobial activity. However, it irritates the skin and so is rarely used for such purposes nowadays. Derivatives of phenol, called phenolics, contain a molecule of phenol that has been altered chemically to reduce its ability to irritate and/or to increase its antimicrobial activity. Phenolics act by damaging PLASMA MEMBRANES, inactivating ENZYMES and denaturing PROTEINS (see DENATURATION). Phenolics include cresols, which are good surface disinfectants, and hexachlorophene, which is used to control NOSOCOMIAL INFECTIONS.

phenol

analgesic, antiseptic and disinfectant organic acid; caustic at high concentrations (80-100%); pure (100%) phenol is crystalline at normal room temperatures; see liquefied phenol BP

phe·nol

(fē'nol)
Hydroxybenzene; an antiseptic, anesthetic, and disinfectant.

phenol (fē´nôl),

n an organic compound in which one or more hydroxyl groups are attached to a carbon atom in an aromatic ring that contains conjugated double bonds.
phenol coefficient,
n a basis of comparison in determining the relative effectiveness of antiseptics. Phenol is the standard for comparison with other agents for their ability to kill a well-dispersed suspension of
Salmonella or
Staphylococcus. It has little practical value.

phenol

1. an extremely poisonous compound obtained by distillation of coal tar or produced synthetically; used as a disinfectant and used extensively as a wood preservative. Called also carbolic acid.
2. any organic compound containing one or more hydroxyl groups attached to an aromatic or carbon ring.

phenol coefficient
a measure of the bactericidal activity of a chemical compound in relation to phenol. The activity of the compound is expressed as the ratio of dilution in which it kills in 10 minutes under specified conditions. It can be determined in the absence of organic matter, or in the presence of a standard amount of added organic matter.
phenol Folin-Ciocalteau
a sensitive, colorimetric method for estimating the protein content of cerebrospinal fluid.
plant phenol
includes gossypol, tannins.
phenol poisoning
animals can be exposed to phenol by skin contact with floors and housing which have been treated with the disinfectant, or other phenol-rich substance such as lignite pitch, or by nibbling at wood treated with it. Causes local tissue necrosis and hepatic injury. Cats are particularly susceptible.
phenol red
References in periodicals archive ?
There is no standardization for phenol application, and each surgeon manages the procedure according to his/her own experience.
Conclusion: Treatment of pilonidal sinus disease with crystallized phenol using the three-step technique is simple, fast, and comfortable.
In this paper, the influence of various factors including aqueous phenol concentration, contact time and pH of solution on the adsorption capacities of banana and grapefruit peels have been investigated.
When ingested through drinking water or smoked food phenol badly affects lungs, kidneys, liver and vascular system (Harris et al.
Phenol industry market dynamics in Spain from 2005 to 2019, consisting of market size, demand and production outlook, demand by end-use sector, and average prices
Bark, a waste material generally available in large quantities from the forest industry, has potential to be used as an alternative feedstock to phenol because bark is rich in phenolic compounds (Harkin and Rowe 1971, Hon and Shiraishi 2000).
What has been the historical and current volume trends in the phenol market?
This will be an absorption-type company split, with SDK serving as the splitting company and AICA SDK PHENOL as the succeeding company.
Thus phenol pollution presents a threat against natural environment and also to human health.
The preparation of new type of composite materials that have distinct properties as modifiers of SPCE for the electrocat-alytic oxidation of phenol and chlorophenols was the aim of this study.
Smoke taint imparts phenols that can negatively affect the flavor and color of wine.
Phenol removal in presence of oxygen is often preferred due to high phenol inhibition on anaerobic processes.