pharyngocele


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pharyngocele

 [fah-ring´go-sēl]
a herniation or cystic deformity of the pharynx.

pha·ryn·go·cele

(fă-ring'gō-sēl),
A diverticulum from the pharynx.
[pharyngo- + G. kēlē, hernia]

pharyngocele

/pha·ryn·go·cele/ (fah-ring´go-sēl″) herniation or cystic deformity of the pharynx.

pharyngocele

(fə-rĭng′gə-sēl′)
n.
Protrusion of mucous membrane through the wall of the pharynx; hernia of the pharynx.

pha·ryn·go·cele

(fă-ring'gō-sēl)
A diverticulum from the pharynx.
[pharyngo- + G. kēlē, hernia]

pharyngocele

a herniation or cystic deformity of the pharynx.
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References in periodicals archive ?
was percutaneously injected into the base of the pharyngocele under flexible fiberoptic guidance and with local anesthesia in clinic (see video at www.
A pharyngocele is a diverticulum of the pharyngeal wall.
A pharyngocele should be considered in the differential diagnosis of dysphagia, and a percutaneous augmentation can be included in the menu of treatment options.
Pharyngoceles typically arise during the fifth and sixth decades of life, and they are more common in men than in women.
Fiberoptic laryngoscopy demonstrated a 5- mm pharyngocele and food remnants in the adjacent vallecula (figure 3).
No symptoms were observed during follow-up, and a barium-swallow x-ray and fiberoptic laryngoscopy revealed no pharyngocele on the left.
Patients with a pharyngocele exhibit a variety of signs and symptoms, depending on the size of the pharyngeal orifice, the size of the diverticulum, whether the pouch drains easily, and whether it is infected.
The recommended treatment of a pharyngocele varies.
A pharyngocele can appear as a mass and is usually associated with various symptoms, including dysphagia, hoarseness, cervical pain, regurgitation, dysphonia, cough, earache, and odynophagia.
When a pharyngocele is suspected in a patient with such a clinical history, the diagnosis can be confirmed by various imaging studies, including plain x-rays, barium swallow, endoscopy, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).
It is also important to recognize, however, that the therapeutic implications of the distinction are not as clear-cut as they once were, and that lesions that combine-features of laryngoceles and pharyngoceles occur.
Bilateral pharyngoceles (branchial cleft anomalies?