phantom


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phantom

 [fan´tom]
1. an image or impression not evoked by actual stimuli.
2. a model of the body or of a specific part thereof.
3. a device for simulating the in vivo effect of radiation on tissues.

phan·tom

(fan'tŏm),
1.
See also: manikin. Synonym(s): phantasm
2. A model, especially a transparent one, of the human body or any of its parts.
See also: manikin.
3. radiology a mechanical or computer-generated model for predicting irradiation dosage deep in the body.
[G. phantasma, an appearance]

phantom

/phan·tom/ (fant´um)
2. a model of the body or of a part thereof.
3. a device for simulating the in vivo effect of radiation on tissues.

phantom

(făn′təm)
n.
Medicine A model of a human body or body part.
adj.
1. Believed to be real even though illusory: a phantom pregnancy.
2. Being a phantom limb: a phantom arm.

phantom

[fan′təm]
Etymology: Gk, phantasma, vision
a mass of material similar to human tissue used to investigate the effect of radiation beams on human beings. Phantom materials can range from water to complex chemical mixtures that faithfully mimic the human body as it would interact with radiation.

phantom

An object of specifically known dimensions and structural properties used to test or monitor an MRI system’s homogeneity, imaging performance and orientation.

phantom

Radiology A mass or dummy that approximates tissues in its physical properties that may be used to calibrate or determine the dose of radiation applied to a tissue. Cf Ballistic jelly.

phan·tom

(fan'tŏm)
1. Synonym(s): phantasm.
2. A model, especially a transparent one, of the human body or any of its parts.
3. radiology A mechanical or computer-originated model for predicting irradiation dosage deep in the body.
[G. phantasma, an appearance]

phan·tom

(fan'tŏm)
1. A model, especially a transparent one, of the human body or its parts.
2. radiology mechanical or computer-generated model for predicting irradiation dosage deep in the body.
[G. phantasma, an appearance]

phantom (fan´tum),

n a device that absorbs and scatters x-radiation in approximately the same way as the tissues of the body.

phantom

1. a model of the body or of a specific part thereof.
2. a device for simulating the in vivo effect of radiation on tissues.

phantom mare
a dummy of a mare used to collect semen for artificial insemination. A padded, hollow device about the height and width that would suit the stallion to be used. Excellent for collecting from an insecure or lame stallion.
phantom parturition
see false pregnancy.
phantom pregnancy
see false pregnancy.
References in classic literature ?
The fog came pouring in at every chink and keyhole, and was so dense without, that although the court was of the narrowest, the houses opposite were mere phantoms.
If we could throw our arms around one another we might find sad comfort in the sharing of our sorrows even in the house of Hades; does Proserpine want to lay a still further load of grief upon me by mocking me with a phantom only?
I see you now lying on this couch but that is only the insensible phantom of the real you that is in me.
I will recall to these gentlemen, that in the deposition taken at his bedside, the assassinated officer, while declaring that he had a vague idea when the black man accosted him that the latter might be the surly monk, added that the phantom had pressed him eagerly to go and make acquaintance with the accused; and upon his, the captain's, remarking that he had no money, he had given him the crown which the said officer paid to la Falourdel.
The voice of Time,' said the Phantom, 'cries to man, Advance
Suddenly he saw the black phantom rush out from somewhere in the middle of the court.
Or is it this: To love those who despise us, and give one's hand to the phantom when it is going to frighten us?
As he falls, the Lascar starts into a half-risen attitude, glares with his eyes, lashes about him fiercely with his arms, and draws a phantom knife.
This body seemed to have less substance than its own phantom walked over by Razumov in the street white with snow.
When he closed his eyes again, he felt it hovering near; as he slowly sunk into a slumber, he was conscious of its gathering strength and purpose, and gradually assuming its recent shape; when he sprang up from his bed, the same phantom vanished from his heated brain, and left him filled with a dread against which reason and waking thought were powerless.
Let me stand aside, to see the phantoms of those days go by me, accompanying the shadow of myself, in dim procession.
But this encompassment of her own characterization, based on shreds of convention, peopled by phantoms and voices antipathetic to her, was a sorry and mistaken creation of Tess's fancy--a cloud of moral hobgoblins by which she was terrified without reason.