phantasm

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phantom

 [fan´tom]
1. an image or impression not evoked by actual stimuli.
2. a model of the body or of a specific part thereof.
3. a device for simulating the in vivo effect of radiation on tissues.

phan·tasm

(fan'tazm),
The mental imagery produced by fantasy.
Synonym(s): phantom (1)
[G. phantasma, an appearance]

phantasm

/phan·tasm/ (fan´tazm) an impression or image not evoked by actual stimuli, and usually recognized as false by the observer.

phantasm

[fan′taz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, phantasma, vision
an illusory image, such as an optical illusion of something that does not exist. See also phantom vision.

phan·tasm

(fan'tazm)
The mental imagery produced by fantasy.
Synonym(s): phantom (1) .
[G. phantasma, an appearance]
References in periodicals archive ?
From the beginning of the novel, Ishiguro focuses Banks' storytelling on the phantasmal presence of the notion of orphanhood; it is actually this trauma that alters his vision of the past.
in their brushed Confederate uniforms," muse beside the "crayon face," concerning their phantasmal courtship of the dead woman, "as if she had been a contemporary of theirs," because, in iconic terms, "she had been.
As we will see below, due to the existence of phantasmal ethers (qi) mysterious winds (feng), elemental alignments (wuxing) and disharmonious perceptions, correct sense perception was regarded as an even more urgent priority in China than it was in the West.
In just one sentence, the bishop refereed to insecurity in general, "common crime, armed groups [a reference to the phantasmal and for most people nonexistent guerrilla group Ejercito del Pueblo Paraguayo (EPP)], kidnappings, and land invasions by some campesinos NotiSur, May 14, 2010 .
What Eco is really getting at is the fact that translation is an indeterminate and imprecise art, requiring constant negotiation between a phantasmal author, an invasive source text and an even vaguer image of a potential reader, not to mention an editor (".
The phrase "the word known to all men" appears first in the thoughts of Stephen Dedalus in "Proteus," then in Hans Walter Gabler's much-debated "restoration" of Stephen's words in "Scylla and Charybdis," and once more in the "Circe" episode when, in confronting the phantasmal presence of his mother, Stephen asks her to tell him the word known to all men and she refuses.
She reminds us of the ample presence of phantasmal lesbians (as prostitutes) in nineteenth-century depictions of the city.
Inception asks many of the same big, challenging, and often unsettling questions that spiritual sages of the past have about how we distinguish between the phantasmal and the authentic.
Toxins produced by the phantasmal poison dart frog (Epipedobates tricolor), a species native to Ecuador, enabled researchers to develop a synthetic compound that shows promise as a pain killer more effective than morphine, but non-addictive.
By locating these kinds of ancestral transmissions either in the "magical" realm (as we see in a novel such as Michael Crummey's Galore) or in a "supernatural/Gothic" context (as in Kenneth Harvey's The Town That Forgot How to Breathe), authors are able to employ the trope of a primordial and phantasmal Newfoundland identity.
This may sound phantasmal, until we consider the impact of IAS on power stations, shipping lanes, train corridors, and other measurable sinews of the state organ; and it is obvious that the pathogenic spread of debilitating and deadly diseases reduces the human capital of the state.
Fox Harrell describes how digital media, or phantasmal media, affects our way of thinking and acting.