phage


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Related to phage: phage display, Phage therapy, phage typing, Lambda phage

bacteriophage

 [bak-te´re-o-fāj″]
a virus that destroys bacteria by lysis; several varieties exist, and usually each attacks only one kind of bacteria. Certain types attach themselves to the cell membrane of the bacterium and instill a charge of DNA into the cytoplasm. DNA carries the genetic code of the virus, so that rapid multiplication of the virus takes place inside the bacterium. The growing viruses act as parasites, using the metabolism of the bacterial cell for growth and development. Eventually the bacterial cell bursts, releasing many more viruses capable of destroying similar bacteria. Called also bacterial virus. adj., adj bacteriopha´gic.

With some bacteria, notably those of the Streptococcus family, infection by certain phages can dramatically alter pathogenicity, converging previously innocuous microbes into deadly pathogenic strains. The so-called “flesh-eating” viruses are a striking example. They are relatively harmless bacteria until new geletic material is incorporated via a phage or plasmid.
temperate bacteriophage one whose genetic material (prophage) becomes an intimate part of the bacterial genome, persisting and being reproduced through many cell division cycles; the affected bacterial cell is known as a lysogenic bacterium.

bac·te·ri·o·phage

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj), Avoid the mispronunciation bak-te'rē-ō-fahzh. Avoid the misspelling and mispronunciation bacterialphage.
A virus with specific affinity for bacteria. Bacteriophages have been found in association with nearly all groups of bacteria, including the Cyanobacteria; like other viruses they contain either (but never both) RNA or DNA and vary in structure from the seemingly simple filamentous bacterial virus to relatively complex forms with contractile "tails"; their relationships to the host bacteria are highly specific and, as in the case of temperate bacteriophage, may be genetically intimate. Bacteriophages are named after the bacterial species, group, or strain for which they are specific, for example, corynebacteriophage, coliphage; a number of families are recognized and have been assigned provisional names: Corticoviridae, Cystoviridae, Fuselloviridae, Inoviridae, Leviviridae, Lipothrixviridae, Microviridae, Myoviridae, Plasmaviridae, Podoviridae, Styloviridae, and Tectiviridae.
See also: coliphage.
Synonym(s): phage
[bacterio- + G. phagō, to eat]

phage

(fāj) bacteriophage.

phage

(fāj)
n.
A bacteriophage.

phage

bac·te·ri·o·phage

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj)
A virus with specific affinity for bacteria. Bacteriophages have been found in essentially all groups of bacteria; like other viruses they contain either RNA or DNA (but never both) and vary in structure from simple to complex; their relationships to host bacteria are specific and may be genetically intimate. Bacteriophages are named after the bacterial species, group, or strain for which they are specific, e.g., corynebacteriophage, coliphage.
See also: coliphage
Synonym(s): phage.
[bacterio- + G. phagō, to eat]

phage

A BACTERIOPHAGE.

phage

see BACTERIOPHAGE.

bacteriophages

viruses with specific affinity for bacteria; used widely in eastern Europe as an alternative to antibiotic therapy

bac·te·ri·o·phage

(bak-tēr'ē-ō-fāj)
A virus with specific affinity for bacteria; found in essentially all groups of bacteria; like other viruses, they contain either RNA or DNA (but never both) and vary in structure from simple to complex; their relationships to host bacteria are specific and may be genetically intimate.
Synonym(s): phage.
[bacterio- + G. phagō, to eat]

phage


phage type
an intraspecies type of bacterium demonstrated by phage typing; called also lysotype and phagotype.
phage typing
characterization of bacteria, extending to strain differences, by demonstration of susceptibility to one or more (a spectrum) races of bacteriophage; widely applied to staphylococci, typhoid bacilli, etc., for epidemiological purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
Beyond the tussle between phage and microbe, these CRISPR and anti-CRISPR systems could help in the fight against human infectious diseases.
diff phages that infect clinically relevant strains of C.
Phage display antibody libraries, including immunized antibody libraries, naive antibody libraries and semi-synthetic/synthetic antibody libraries.
Bacteria can "steal" small pieces of DNA from phages that attack them, and use these stolen pieces to recognize and respond to the attacker, in a manner similar to usage of antibodies by the human immune system.
People die because western medicine is no longer aware of phage therapy.
This system was also used to define rules of compatibilities between the phage attachment sites harboured by the different CTX[PHI] variants characterized to date and their host dimer resolution sites (36): integration is solely determined by possibility to form Watson-Crick or Wobble base pair interactions to stabilize the exchange of strands promoted by XerC-catalysis between the phage attachment site and its target dimer resolution site (Table II and Fig.
Wells were dug into the agar by employing a sterile cork borer and the 20 [micro] 1 phage SH suspension (3 x [10.
Phages reproduce by insinuating themselves into bacteria.
These phages are environmentally ubiquitous and only attack bacteria.
Lytic phages multiply until the bacterial membrane bursts apart, releasing endotoxins (produced by the bacterium in self-defense) and a new population of bacteriophages.
Solomon gave 100 of the mice monthly doses of the phage in a nose spray.
The corporation has successfully developed cutting-edge patented intellectual property for a phage product pipeline to target bacterial diseases to both prevent and cure infections, including those resistant to antibiotics.