pestis


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plague

(plāg),
1. Any disease of wide prevalence or of excessive mortality.
2. An acute infectious disease caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and marked clinically by high fever, toxemia, prostration, a petechial eruption, lymph node enlargement, pneumonia, or hemorrhage from the mucous membranes; primarily a disease of rodents, transmitted to humans by fleas that have bitten infected animals. In humans the disease takes one of four clinical forms: bubonic plague, septicemic plague, pneumonic plague, or ambulant plague Synonym(s): pest, pestilence (1) , pestis
[G. plege, a stroke, a wound; L. plaga, a stroke, injury]

pestis

pestis

(pes'tis) [L.] Plague.

pestis ambulans

Ambulatory plague.

pestis fulminans

The most severe form of plague.

pestis

see plague.
References in periodicals archive ?
pestis in prehistoric people from Eurasia and southern Siberia, showing that it could have been causing human disease even before the beginning of the plague's documentation, according to the study.
pestis strain CYP 0579 from the culture collection Fiocruz-CYP was reactivated by inoculation in brain heart infusion broth media (Difco, USA) and incubated overnight at 37[degrees]C.
Kimi decided to speak out to make sure other dog owners know about yersinia pestis.
Plague is a bacterial disease of rodents caused by Yersinia pestis, and approximately 90% of cases are reported from Africa.
In our view, the most promising areas in the study of modern sources of regional development and regional innovation strategy include cluster approach (Avdeychik, Pestis, and Struk, 2009; Bogdan, 2000), noospheric principle (Nikitenko, 2000; Demchuk and Yurkevich, 2003), concept of sustainable and mobile support (Gyachas et al.
pestis EV vaccine produced by the Aikimbaev Kazakh Scientific Center for Quarantine and Zoonotic Infections, Kazakhstan.
Yersinia pestis hasn't disappeared, but the bacterium no longer thrives in the socio-economic petri dish that was medieval Europe and is treatable with modern health care.
The researchers found that a specific strain of the plague bug Yersinia pestis caused the pandemic that killed 100 million Europeans - between 30% and 50% of the total population - in just five years between 1347 and 1351.
Pestis will return in force, in a similar way to the Middle Ages.
Sylvatic plague, caused by Yersinia pestis (a gram-negative bacterium), is mainly transmitted via bites from infected fleas.
In the United States, it's the "rat flea" (Xenopsylla cheopis) that is the most common vector of the Yersinia pestis bacteria.
18, 2009, the Chicago Department of Public Health was notified by a local hospital of a suspected case of fatal laboratory-acquired infection with Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of plague.