perseveration


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perseveration

 [per-sev″er-a´shun]
the inappropriate persistence or repetition of a thought or action after the causative stimulus has ceased or in response to different stimuli; for example, a patient answers a question correctly but incorrectly gives the same answer to succeeding questions. Perseveration is most often associated with brain lesions but is also seen in schizophrenia.

per·sev·er·a·tion

(per-sev'ĕr-ā'shŭn),
1. The constant repetition of a meaningless word or phrase.
2. The duration of a mental impression, measured by the rapidity with which one impression follows another as determined by the revolving of a two-colored disc.
3. In clinical psychology, the uncontrollable repetition of a previously appropriate or correct response, even though the repeated response has since become inappropriate or incorrect.
[L. persevero, to persist]

perseveration

/per·sev·er·a·tion/ (per-sev″er-a´shun) persistent repetition of the same verbal or motor response to varied stimuli; continuance of activity after cessation of the causative stimulus.

perseveration

(pər-sĕv′ə-rā′shən)
n.
1. Psychology
a. Uncontrollable repetition of a particular response, such as a word, phrase, or gesture, despite the absence or cessation of a stimulus, usually caused by brain injury or other organic disorder.
b. The tendency to continue or repeat an act or activity after the cessation of the original stimulus.
2. The act or an instance of persevering; perseverance.

perseveration

[pur′səvərā′shən]
Etymology: L, persevero, to persist
the involuntary and pathological persistence of the same verbal response or motor activity regardless of the stimulus or its duration. The condition occurs primarily in patients with brain damage or organic mental disorders, although it may also appear in schizophrenia as an association disturbance. It is caused by a neurological deficit.

perseveration

The repetition of a specific verbal or motor response to a particular stimulus, despite the stimulus’s cessation.

Aetiology
Organic brain disease, traumatic brain injury, schizophrenia.

perseveration

Neurology The repeating of the same verbal or motor response to varied stimuli Etiology Organic brain disease, schizophrenia

per·sev·er·a·tion

(pĕr-sĕv'ĕr-ā'shŭn)
1. The constant repetition of a meaningless word or phrase.
2. The duration of a mental impression, measured by the rapidity with which one impression follows another as determined by the revolving of a two-colored disc.
3. clinical psychology The uncontrollable repetition of a previously appropriate or correct response, even though the repeated response has since become inappropriate or incorrect.
[L. persevero, to persist]

perseveration

1. The involuntary continuation or repetition of an activity, action or verbal or other response.
2. The continuing, unchanged perception of a scene for a short time after the direction of gaze has changed. This form of perseveration usually indicates organic brain damage.

Patient discussion about perseveration

Q. If the lie is our truth & living the truth feels fake & unreal how do we persevere to the needed chang there's the real me, good & underdeveloped. there is the worldly me, challenged as all of us probably are. there is the addict me, afflicted half or more of my life, developed & strong. two out of three are tough odds to deal with...

A. the battle against your own self is harsh and there will be casualties. reality is based on your own definition of the world around you, but it also based on how the world defines you. this is your escape from the inner struggle- define yourself and your actions not by your own faulty judgment but by how the world and it's moral judge you.
good luck.

More discussions about perseveration
References in periodicals archive ?
Executive control was operationalised in this study as decreased, cognitive flexibility and increased perseveration, as measured by the WCST.
The most important step to finding the best solutions is to avoid the penalty of perseveration, which is the price we pay when we worry too much about how expanding charters or some other new initiative will affect the established model and power structure of public schooling in force now.
Other areas of common cognitive deficit such as memory, perseveration and impulsivity may also be related to disorders of attention.
These gains were paired with significant decreases in the amount of self-absorption, avoidance, self-stimulation, and perseveration observed in the children (Greenspan & Wieder, 2006).
Language: Incoherence, perseveration, insufficient speech, irrelevant talk and use of neologisms are frequently seen in schizophrenia.
Example 8 is an instance in which it is not possible to tell with any degree of certainty whether the entire side perseverated together, but a homologous finger-pair perseveration is possible.
A sampling of topics includes Asperger's syndrome, emotional/behavioral tests, perseveration, Kim Peek (whose story inspired the movie Rain Man), special needs trusts, and vaccines.
Yet while Weber seemingly extends Nietzsche's polemic against Christian asceticism as a perseveration of bad conscience, Weber's theses on Calvinist self-denial vex the natural primacy Nietzsche bestows upon an aggressive instinct that external influences pervert into a masochistic conscience.
Being subjected to this mantra once more re-evokes the perseveration we routinely suffer in the moral ambiguity characterising our supposedly post-politics milieu.
No CDT scores were associated with verbal-fluency, California-Verbal-Learning-Test, Mattis DRS-Memory subtest, Trails A or B, Digit-Symbol-Test, categories, or perseveration on the Wisconsin-Card-Sort.
Scores on the DRS, which measures attention, perseveration, and memory, range from 0 to 144, with higher scores indicating better function.
It has been used as a test of perseveration and to assess the ability to sort cards according to class membership.