perseverate

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perseverate

(pər-sĕv′ə-rāt′)
intr.v. persever·ated, persever·ating, persever·ates Psychology
To manifest or experience perseveration.

per·sev′er·a′tive adj.
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Bloom's particular mode of perseverating the past and resisting the forward movement of time can be clarified by returning to the drowning man image.
The rationale for the 24-hour separation between trials was to prevent either perseverating or alternating tendencies.
By determining at least three subject areas to discuss, the therapist can vary the session to keep the attention of someone who has difficulty in single issue attending, and can also move a perseverating client from one subject to the next.
Obsessive behaviour (sequencing, orienting to specific sounds continuously, perseverating
He started screaming in his cell, praying, and perseverating that he "needed to kill himself," which triggered his transfer to the NMBHI.
We learned ways to approach eating, driving, conversation, boredom, the experience of joy and sorrow, and so on with a more focused awareness on the here and now, and with less mind-drifting or perseverating into plans and worries for the future, or guilt and resentment over the past.
33) Theta brain waves are increased during hypnosis, as we now know, indicating why it is so fortuitous to correct old beliefs, release old perseverating memories, and construct new paradigms within the hypnotic trance state.
Because it was easy to spend meeting time perseverating about administrative details, it became the rule that half of every meeting would address a professional topic, which would come first.
73) Theta brain waves are increased during hypnosis as well, indicating why it is so fortuitous to correct old beliefs, release old perseverating memories, and construct new paradigms within the hypnotic trance.
Both psychotherapy and medication can reduce activation in this area of the brain, relieving the symptoms of perseverating thoughts which lead to obsessive attempts to control anticipated outcomes.
Jung's key insight about the relation of the unconscious to consciousness was that it not only represents the haunting presence of the past as Freud had taught--in the form of complexes, perseverating family dynamics and traumas, repressed infantile sexuality, etc.