peripersonal

peripersonal

(pĕr″ĭ-pŭr′sŭn-ĭl)
Near the body; within arm's reach.
References in periodicals archive ?
Those with anxiety traits were found to have larger peripersonal space.
Researchers classified those who reacted more strongly to further away stimuli as having a large 'defensive peripersonal space' (DPPS).
An extended body space (a body with longer limbs occupies more volume than a normal body) affects also the special space surrounding our body that is called peripersonal space -- a space that when violated by objects or other people can be experienced as a threat or intimacy, depending on the context.
Among the topics are cortical and thalamic pathways for multisensory and sensorimotor interplay, multisensory integration through neural coherence, animal and human studies of spatial and temporal features of multisensory processes, the late development of multisensory integration in humans, peripersonal space as a multisensory interface for body-object interactions, the body in a multisensory world, and a multisensory perspectives on human auditory communication.
Patients may neglect their own personal space, the peripersonal space that is within their reach, or the far space beyond their reach (Robertson & Halligan, 1999).
The 22 articles cover the methodology of imagery and visuo-spatial functions (including early methods for assessment, expectancy manipulations and object-location memory, the image scanning paradigm and the use of transcranial magnetic stimulation), models and components of imagery and visuo-spatial processes (including neural bases and cognitive mechanisms, working memory, the episodic buffer, numerical representation, and motor components), aging (including working memory, imagery, object-location memory in aging and dementia, relationships to mental deterioration and using visual imagery in verbal associative learning), and neuropsychological aspects (navigation, visuomotor control, peripersonal space, illusions, and unilateral neglect syndrome).
These spatial frames can be described as personal, peripersonal and extrapersonal (Robertson & Halligan, 1999).