peripatetic


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Related to peripatetic: Aristotelian

per·i·pa·tet·ic

(per'i-pă-tet'ik),
1. Walking around; formerly used to describe a patient with "walking" (i.e., mild) typhoid fever.
2. Relating to a disease imported to a nonendemic area by a host clinically unaffected during the transport phase.
[G. peripatēsis, a walking about]

peripatetic

[-pətet′ik]
Etymology: Gk, peripatein, to walk about
pertaining to an ambulatory typhoid patient.

peripatetic

As used in UK healthcare groups, a term referring to resources or services which are flexible and can be deployed where and when needed, rather than from one fixed place.

per·i·pa·tet·ic

(per'i-pă-tet'ik)
1. Walking around.
2. Relating to a disease imported to a nonendemic area by a host clinically unaffected during the transport phase.
[G. peripatēsis, a walking about]
References in periodicals archive ?
Savings in the peripatetic music services have therefore been achieved without the need for voluntary redundancies or early retirements.
In The Peripatetic Thelwall infused radical politics into a strange collection of literary genres that allowed him a deeper, more pervasive presentation of democratic ideals than one finds in either the age's political pamphlets or its "Jacobin" novels.
5] Librarians at the University of Wisconsin-Madison address the peripatetic nature of most student athletes by providing e-mail reference service.
Cool Earl and Cornbread, a pair of peripatetic Pennsylvanians who started scribbling their names on walls throughout Philadelphia beginning in the mid-1960s are credited by some as the progenitors of the graffiti movement.
By the early '70s, worn out by a flamboyant, peripatetic lifestyle, he began to self-destruct.
The "speaker" of the poems--and his very identity is mobile, evanescent--sits in bars, lounges, and other places of transcience ("the Long / Night Lounge," "Wrack Tavern / Inn of Many Monikers") simultaneously moving ("It was a train we were on / peripatetic tavern we / were in, mind unremittingly elsewhere").
The rest of the list is predicated on the peripatetic proletariat.
Ann Wilson is a theology student and a peripatetic freelance writer.
Relying on the abundant evidence he found in memoirs and the contemporary press, Bodek pieced together a portrait of the working world of agitprop, including information on their intense and peripatetic schedule as well as the constant police harassment that forced them to move about even more than planned and to perform under deceptive auspices.
But these peripatetic viewers are also less likely to accept what they see without question, especially when hundreds of alternatives bid for their time and attention.
With this Wordsworthian peripatetic comes a larger `georgic promise', dear to modern eco-politics and, as is refreshingly clear, to Wallace's own heart, `that by a common practice, by walking, we may join the poet in the restoration of rural values and replacement (in both senses) of cultivation.
Wallace, Walking, Literature, and English Culture: The Origins and Uses of Peripatetic in the Nineteenth Century (Oxford: Clarendon P, 1993), 265 pp.