perinatal death

per·i·na·tal death

an inclusive term referring to both stillborn infants and neonatal deaths.

perinatal death

1 the death of a fetus weighing 500 g or more at 22 or more weeks of gestation.
2 the death of an infant between birth and the end of the neonatal period.

perinatal death

A foetal death after 24 completed weeks gestation and before 6 completed days of life.
References in periodicals archive ?
A ruptured uterus is indeed the principal risk associated with TOLAC, and it can have serious sequelae including perinatal death, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (HIE), and hysterectomy.
Maternal obesity is also linked to greater risk of pre-term birth, large-for-gestational-age babies, fetal defects, congenital anomalies, and perinatal death.
11] Intrapartum asphyxia and birth trauma were the major underlying causes of perinatal death, with a rate of 4.
The region has the highest perinatal death rate, deaths at age under 7 days, in England and Wales, at 7.
Babies born from pregnancies with placental insufficiency are not only at increased risk of perinatal death or complications such as cerebral palsy, but very typically there are long term consequences for their health which include diabetes and cardiovascular disease.
7 per 1000 births--has stayed relatively constant since 2006, as has the perinatal death rate, which was equivalent to one baby dying for every 100 babies born.
The researchers looked at the following outcomes: preterm delivery (delivery before 37 weeks' gestation); low birth weight (below 2500g); perinatal death (fetal death after 20 weeks' gestation including stillbirth and neonatal death up to one month) and admission to neonatal intensive care or special care baby units.
Health bosses confirmed a perinatal death took place three days ago and an incident management policy is being followed through.
Similar to the situation with maternal death, information on causes of perinatal death of the fetus and neonate is extremely important not only for management of future pregnancies but also for policy-making and planning, monitoring, and evaluation of health programs, as well as being necessary for field research, comparisons, and epidemic awareness.
He explained that it can cause premature birth; increase the risk of the baby being large for its gestational age (macrosomia); lead to placental abruption in which the placenta that links the blood supply to the unborn baby starts to come away from the wall of the womb; and cause perinatal death (stillborn baby), among others.
All 6 randomised controlled trials found a reduction in adverse perinatal outcomes; our meta-analysis showed significant reductions in perinatal death (relative risk 0.

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