perfusion


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perfusion

 [per-fu´zhun]
1. the act of pouring through or over; especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured through or over an organ or tissue.
tissue perfusion the circulation of blood through the vascular bed of tissue.
ineffective tissue perfusion (specify type) (renal, cerebral, cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, peripheral) a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual has a decrease in oxygen resulting in failure to nourish the tissues at the capillary level.

per·fu·sion

(per-fyū'zhŭn),
1. The act of perfusing.
2. The flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue, as in ventilation:perfusion ratio.

perfusion

/per·fu·sion/ (-zhun)
1. the act of pouring over or through, especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured over or through an organ or tissue.

luxury perfusion  abnormally increased flow of blood to an area of the brain, leading to swelling.

perfusion

(pər-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of perfusing.
2. The injection of fluid into a blood vessel in order to reach an organ or tissues, usually to supply nutrients and oxygen.

perfusion

[pərfyo̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, perfundere, to pour over
1 the passage of a fluid through a specific organ or an area of the body.
2 a therapeutic measure whereby a drug intended for an isolated part of the body is introduced via the bloodstream.

perfusion

Bathing an organ or tissue with a fluid. See Arterial perfusion, Hyperthermic perfusion, Isolated hepatic perfusion, Limb perfusion, Myocardial perfusion Oncology A technique used for a melanoma of an arm or leg; circulation to and from the limb is stopped with a tourniquet; chemotherapy is put directly into the circulation to ↑ regional drug dose Transplantation The intravascular irrigation of an isolated organ with blood, plasma or physiologic substance, to either studying its metabolism or physiology under 'normal' conditions or for maintaining the organ as 'fresh' as possible, while transporting donated organs to recipients. See Slush preparation.

per·fu·sion

(pĕr-fyū'zhŭn)
1. The act of perfusing.
2. The flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue, as in ventilation:perfusion ratio.

perfusion

1. The passage of blood or other fluids through the body.
2. The effectiveness with which a part, such as the brain, is supplied with blood.

perfusion

the passage of a liquid through an organ or tissue.

Perfusion

The passage of fluid (such as blood) through a specific organ or area of the body (such as the heart).
Mentioned in: Shock, Thallium Heart Scan

perfusion

in physiology and pathology, refers to blood flow in a region, organ or tissue; hypoperfusion inadequate blood flow.

perfusion

passage of blood and tissue fluid through the capillary bed

per·fu·sion

(pĕr-fyū'zhŭn)
Flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue.

perfusion (pərfūzhən),

n a therapeutic measure whereby a drug intended for an isolated part of the body is introduced via the bloodstream.

perfusion

1. the act of pouring through or over; especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured through or over an organ or tissue.

perfusion pressure
the gradient between arterial blood pressure and venous pressure in a comparable location in the vascular tree.
pulmonary perfusion
blood flow through the pulmonary capillaries.
renal perfusion
the rate of perfusion in the kidney is much higher than in any other organ. The rate of formation of urine depends to a large extent on the perfusion rate.
perfusion scan
using pulmonary scintigraphy, radionucleotide agents injected into a peripheral vein can be detected where it is trapped in the pulmonary capillary bed. Used to assess pulmonary blood flow.
perfusion technique
maintenance of blood circulation to tissues during cardiopulmonary bypass.
perfusion:ventilation ratio
see ventilation: perfusion ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reportedly, this nomination committee has been appointed in accordance with the instruction determined at the Annual General Meeting of Xvivo Perfusion AB on 3 May 2016.
In Minor coronary artery disease group 4 patients scans show minor intensity fixed perfusion defect in distal anteroseptal and distal inferoseptal areas while rest of all the 14 patients studies demonstrate moderate intensity fixed perfusion defects involving distal halves of anteroseptal and inferoseptal walls.
CT perfusion offers an alternative approach for a preoperative noninvasive diagnosis.
The extensive evidence base supporting myocardial perfusion PET for patients requiring pharmacologic stress imaging prompted the development of this joint societal Position Statement," says Timothy Bateman MD, lead author of the statement and Professor of Medicine at the University of Missouri in Kansas City.
Today, many respondents to our annual survey predict that perfusion will make a comeback as the manufacturing method of choice, although significantly more improvements are needed in downstream equipment for continuous bioprocessing.
The perfusion function of the muscle was quantified by a proposed model to obtain analytic results.
The ambr system has been used as a semi-continuous chemostat model for perfusion culture in 10-15mL micro bioreactors by using the ambr workstation's integrated cell counter to monitor cell density and calculate both cell growth rates and dilution volumes required to maintain stable cell density.
The perfusion index is the ratio of the pulsatile to non-pulsatile signal measured by pulse oximetry and is available on some commercial pulse oximetry systems.
The "reverse redistribution" phenomenon (RR) refers to a myocardial perfusion defect that develops on rest imaging, whereas scans acquired after stress show an apparently uniform distribution.
Objective: To discuss the diagnostic value of arterial spin labeling (ASL) in the transient ischemic attack (TIA) patients with unilateral middle cerebral artery (MCA) stenosis by comparing the differences of perfusion results between dynamic susceptibility contrast enhancement (DSC) and ASL in the perfusion evaluation of unilateral MCA stenosis, and to prove that ASL would be a promising method to assess cerebral hemodynamics in future.