perfusion


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perfusion

 [per-fu´zhun]
1. the act of pouring through or over; especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured through or over an organ or tissue.
tissue perfusion the circulation of blood through the vascular bed of tissue.
ineffective tissue perfusion (specify type) (renal, cerebral, cardiopulmonary, gastrointestinal, peripheral) a nursing diagnosis accepted by the North American Nursing Diagnosis Association, defined as a state in which an individual has a decrease in oxygen resulting in failure to nourish the tissues at the capillary level.

per·fu·sion

(per-fyū'zhŭn),
1. The act of perfusing.
2. The flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue, as in ventilation:perfusion ratio.

perfusion

/per·fu·sion/ (-zhun)
1. the act of pouring over or through, especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured over or through an organ or tissue.

luxury perfusion  abnormally increased flow of blood to an area of the brain, leading to swelling.

perfusion

(pər-fyo͞o′zhən)
n.
1. The act or an instance of perfusing.
2. The injection of fluid into a blood vessel in order to reach an organ or tissues, usually to supply nutrients and oxygen.

perfusion

[pərfyo̅o̅′zhən]
Etymology: L, perfundere, to pour over
1 the passage of a fluid through a specific organ or an area of the body.
2 a therapeutic measure whereby a drug intended for an isolated part of the body is introduced via the bloodstream.

perfusion

Bathing an organ or tissue with a fluid. See Arterial perfusion, Hyperthermic perfusion, Isolated hepatic perfusion, Limb perfusion, Myocardial perfusion Oncology A technique used for a melanoma of an arm or leg; circulation to and from the limb is stopped with a tourniquet; chemotherapy is put directly into the circulation to ↑ regional drug dose Transplantation The intravascular irrigation of an isolated organ with blood, plasma or physiologic substance, to either studying its metabolism or physiology under 'normal' conditions or for maintaining the organ as 'fresh' as possible, while transporting donated organs to recipients. See Slush preparation.

per·fu·sion

(pĕr-fyū'zhŭn)
1. The act of perfusing.
2. The flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue, as in ventilation:perfusion ratio.

perfusion

1. The passage of blood or other fluids through the body.
2. The effectiveness with which a part, such as the brain, is supplied with blood.

perfusion

the passage of a liquid through an organ or tissue.

Perfusion

The passage of fluid (such as blood) through a specific organ or area of the body (such as the heart).
Mentioned in: Shock, Thallium Heart Scan

perfusion

in physiology and pathology, refers to blood flow in a region, organ or tissue; hypoperfusion inadequate blood flow.

perfusion

passage of blood and tissue fluid through the capillary bed

per·fu·sion

(pĕr-fyū'zhŭn)
Flow of blood or other perfusate per unit volume of tissue.

perfusion (pərfūzhən),

n a therapeutic measure whereby a drug intended for an isolated part of the body is introduced via the bloodstream.

perfusion

1. the act of pouring through or over; especially the passage of a fluid through the vessels of a specific organ.
2. a liquid poured through or over an organ or tissue.

perfusion pressure
the gradient between arterial blood pressure and venous pressure in a comparable location in the vascular tree.
pulmonary perfusion
blood flow through the pulmonary capillaries.
renal perfusion
the rate of perfusion in the kidney is much higher than in any other organ. The rate of formation of urine depends to a large extent on the perfusion rate.
perfusion scan
using pulmonary scintigraphy, radionucleotide agents injected into a peripheral vein can be detected where it is trapped in the pulmonary capillary bed. Used to assess pulmonary blood flow.
perfusion technique
maintenance of blood circulation to tissues during cardiopulmonary bypass.
perfusion:ventilation ratio
see ventilation: perfusion ratio.
References in periodicals archive ?
Today, many respondents to our annual survey predict that perfusion will make a comeback as the manufacturing method of choice, although significantly more improvements are needed in downstream equipment for continuous bioprocessing.
The three cases described demonstrate steep reductions in the perfusion index, immediately before (three to five minutes) anaesthesia emergence.
The suture was removed after CT perfusion on the first hour of ischemia.
The results showed that even though cerebral perfusion among the ALC individuals, as a whole, improved with abstinence from alcohol, those ALC who were chronic smokers demonstrated significantly less perfusion recovery, particularly in the frontal lobes.
The study was a follow-up to the Detection of Ischemia in Asymptomatic Diabetics (DIAD)-1 study, which documented a 22% prevalence of silent myocardial ischemia during adenosine stress testing with sestamibi single-photon emission computed tomography myocardial perfusion imaging.
Five days after reduction of utero-placental perfusion on gestational day 19, the RUPP group had a significant increase in systolic blood pressure (mean = 150 [+ or -] 3 mmHg; *** p < 0.
During perfusion, water may be pumped into cells; the purpose of a colloid is to draw the water out, so tha the cells don't swell and burst.
With Toshiba's Aquilion ONE, a combination of CTA and CT myocardial perfusion can be utilized to visualize blood flow and more precisely identify ischemia with less radiation than PET/CT and/or SPECT imaging.
2 Perfusion Disposables Market, Australia, Revenue ($m), by Segment, 2005-2012 35 4.
To improve cardiac diagnoses with simplified dose reduction technology, Toshiba announces the FDA clearance of its industry-exclusive CT Myocardial Perfusion capability.
We previously noted that positioning the parturient so as to maximise cardiac output has a high probability of maximising both placental perfusion and foetal oxygenation (1).