perfectionism


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

perfectionism

 [per-fek´shun-izm]
the setting for oneself or others of a standard of flawless work or performance, or at least of one that is higher than the situation requires.

per·fec·tion·ism

(per-fek'shŭn-izm),
A tendency to set rigid high standards of performance for oneself.

perfectionism

(pər-fĕk′shə-nĭz′əm)
n.
A propensity for being displeased with anything that is not perfect or does not meet extremely high standards.

per·fec′tion·ist adj. & n.
per·fec′tion·is′tic adj.

perfectionism

[pərfek′shəniz′əm]
Etymology: L, perficere, to complete
a subjective state in which a person pursues an extremely high standard of performance and, in many cases, demands the same standards of others. Failure to attain the goals may lead to feelings of defeat and other adverse psychological consequences.

perfectionism

Psychiatry A personality trait of many physicians, consisting of obsessiveness, overwork, checking compulsions, and other behaviors regarding Pt management, and ↓ ability to enjoy family, friends, and basic human needs. See Anal. Cf Obsessive-compulsive disorder.

per·fec·tion·ism

(pĕr-fek'shŭn-izm)
A tendency to set rigid high standards of performance for oneself.
References in periodicals archive ?
One area of the perfectionism in sport literature that has apparently received limited attention is the degree to which this characteristic is consistent across situations, that is, whether perfectionism is stable and persistent under various conditions (i.
We can begin to situate Endgame as a work that embodies and develops the idea of Emersonian moral perfectionism by foregrounding Hamm's "sense of disappointment with the world," the (possible) ethical impulses behind his desire to "un-create" it, and the ordinariness of what Cavell calls a persistently "divided self" (2005, 2).
Consistent with these descriptors, when the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 2000) lists perfectionism as one criterion for obsessive compulsive personality disorder, it refers to the possession of "overly strict standards" (p.
1990) conceptualizes and assesses perfectionism on six subscales, using the 35 item Frost Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale: Concern over Mistakes; Doubts about Actions; Personal Standards; Parental Expectations; Parental Criticism; Organization.
I include it here because many experts cite perfectionism as a foundational personality characteristic that predisposes subjects to encounter the combination of factors that precipitate chronic fatigue syndrome.
The attorney won't even notice your perfectionism, much less appreciate it.
The Multidimensional Perfectionism Scale, the Body Esteem Scale and the Profile of Mood States were also used to evaluate the relationships between eating disorders and psychological characteristics.
The apparently improvised sequence in the off-hours of a cafe in Roberta demonstrates not just their tapping skills, but their growing complicity as dancing partners: Although they must have rehearsed the number over and over again (Astaire's perfectionism was legendary), its apparent spontaneity is enchanting.
CHICAGO -- Self-oriented and socially prescribed perfectionism in female college students who also have body dissatisfaction are important factors putting these women at risk for eating disorders, Christina A.
Perfectionism is a terrible way to sabotage a business.