percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty


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Related to percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty: Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty

angioplasty

 [an´je-o-plas″te]
an angiographic procedure for elimination of areas of narrowing in blood vessels.
balloon angioplasty angioplasty in which a balloon catheter is inflated inside an artery, stretching the intima and leaving a ragged interior surface after deflation, which triggers a healing response and breaking up of plaque.
percutaneous transluminal angioplasty a type of balloon angioplasty in which the catheter is inserted through the skin and through the lumen of the vessel to the site of the narrowing.
percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) percutaneous transluminal angioplasty to enlarge the lumen of a sclerotic coronary artery (see accompanying illustration). This provides an alternative to cardiac bypass surgery for selected patients with ischemic heart disease. See also heart.
 Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA). A, Balloon-tipped catheter positioned in blocked artery. B, Balloon is centered. C, Balloon expands to (D) compress blockage. E, Artery diameter opened. From Polaski and Tatro, 1996.

per·cu·ta·ne·ous trans·lu·mi·nal cor·o·nar·y an·gi·o·plas·ty (PTCA),

an operation for enlarging the narrowed lumen of a coronary artery by inflating and withdrawing through the stenotic region a balloon on the tip of an angiographic catheter.

PTCA is a minimally invasive surgical procedure for the treatment of coronary atherosclerosis. A balloon-tipped catheter is inserted percutaneously into the arterial circulation, advanced to the aortic root, and directed with a flexible guide wire to the site of coronary stenosis. Having been positioned within the narrowed arterial segment, the balloon is inflated so as to stretch the lumen, fracture the obstructing plaque, or both. Balloon angioplasty is considered successful when there is more than a 20% increase in the caliber of the stenotic artery and restoration of at least 50% of normal patency, without acute complications. The procedure has approximately a 90% immediate success rate. It offers advantages in symptom improvement and exercise tolerance when compared with medical therapy, particularly in the short term, and is less hazardous and has a shorter recovery period than coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG). Operative mortality is about 2%. There is a 1-3% risk of nonfatal acute myocardial infarction during the procedure and a 1-3% risk that emergency CABG will be required. Hence, the procedure is contraindicated unless a coronary bypass surgical team is immediately available. It is also contraindicated in people without demonstrated significant vascular obstruction, as well as in those with severe multivessel disease or more than 50% stenosis of the left main coronary artery. Angioplasty performed within 2 hours after onset of pain in acute myocardial infarction yields a lower mortality rate and lower rates of nonfatal reinfarction and hemorrhagic stroke than thrombolytic therapy. Despite the advantages of PTCA, 30-50% of patients require repeat balloon angioplasty or CABG for restenosis within 6 months. Insertion of a stainless steel stent at the time of balloon angioplasty to maintain arterial patency has improved initial success and reduced the 6-month restenosis rate. Paclitaxel- and sirolimus-eluting stents further reduce the risk of restenosis.

percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

(trăns-lo͞o′mə-nəl, trănz-)
n.
A procedure for enlarging a narrowed arterial lumen by peripheral introduction of a balloon-tip catheter followed by dilation of the lumen as the inflated catheter tip is withdrawn.

percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA)

a technique in the treatment of atherosclerotic coronary heart disease and angina pectoris in which some plaques in the arteries of the heart are flattened against the arterial walls, resulting in improved circulation. The procedure involves threading a catheter through the vessel to the atherosclerotic plaque, inflating and deflating a small balloon at the tip of the catheter several times, and then removing the catheter. The procedure is performed under radiographic or ultrasonic visualization. When it is successful, the plaques remain compressed and the symptoms of heart disease, including the pain of angina, are decreased. The alternative to this treatment is coronary bypass surgery, which is more expensive and dangerous and requires longer hospitalization and rehabilitation.
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Percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

A term which is now being retired in favour of percutaneous coronary intervention, a term which is broader in scope and includes use of balloons, stents, and atherectomy as means of increasing blood flow through native coronary arteries.

percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty

PCTA Interventional cardiology A procedure in which an angioplasty balloon is inserted percutaneously into the arteries advanced to a stenosis, and inflated, reopening the lumen Indications Single and multivessel CAD, stable angina on exertion, unstable angina, acute MI–'primary' PCTA, stenosed renal arteries, arteries with fibromuscular hyperplasia, post-thrombolytic therapy Success rate 90%; re-stenosis in 30%; success is lower with stenoses that are chronic, long, eccentric, angulated, calcified, at branching, or with intraluminal thrombi, unstable angina, ↑ age, ♀. See Balloon angioplasty, Coronary artery bypass surgery, Excimer laser therapy. Cf Balloon valvoplasty.

per·cu·ta·ne·ous trans·lu·mi·nal cor·o·nar·y an·gi·o·plas·ty

(PTCA) (pĕr'kyū-tānĕ-ŭs trans-lūmi-năl kōrŏ-nar-ē anjē-ō-plastē)
Surgical operation for enlarging the narrowed lumen of a coronary artery by inflating and withdrawing through the stenotic region a balloon on the tip of an angiographic catheter.

per·cu·ta·ne·ous trans·lu·mi·nal cor·o·nar·y an·gi·o·plas·ty

(PTCA) (pĕr'kyū-tānĕ-ŭs trans-lūmi-năl kōrŏ-nar-ē anjē-ō-plastē)
Surgical operation for enlarging the narrowed lumen of a coronary artery by inflating and withdrawing through the stenotic region a balloon on the tip of an angiographic catheter.
References in periodicals archive ?
7% PTCA indicates percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty.
This report analyzes the worldwide markets for Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angioplasty (PTCA) Products in US$ Million by the following product types: Balloon Catheters, Guiding Catheters, and Guide Wires.
The European percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) balloon market, comprising both normal and cutting balloons, was valued in excess of $180 million.
MRG's US Markets for Interventional Cardiology Devices 2011 report provides critical insight into trends that will fuel market growth for coronary stents, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty balloon catheters, accessory devices (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty guidewires, diagnostic catheters, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty guiding catheters, introducer sheaths, and chronic total occlusion crossing devices), intravascular imaging catheters and pressure guidewires (intravascular ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, and fractional flow reserve), and coronary atherectomy devices through 2014.
Angiomax is indicated for use as an anticoagulant in patients with unstable angina undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and with provisional GP IIb/IIIa inhibition in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI).
In June, the label was expanded to include PCI in addition to patients undergoing percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA).
Product categories covered include drug-eluting coronary stents, bare-metal coronary stents, percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) balloons, guidewires, guiding catheters, diagnostic catheters, embolic protection devices, intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) catheters, introducer sheaths, atherectomy devices, thrombectomy devices, inflation devices, and vascular closure devices.

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