percussion

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percussion

 [per-kush´un]
1. in physical examination, striking a part of the body with short, sharp blows of the fingers in order to determine the size, position, and density of the underlying parts by the sound obtained. Percussion is most commonly used on the chest and back for examination of the heart and lungs. For example, since the heart is not resonant and the adjacent lungs are, when the examiner's fingers strike the chest over the heart the sound waves will change in pitch. This serves as a guide to the precise location and size of the heart.
2. the rhythmic clapping of cupped hands over various segments of the lungs to mobilize secretions; called also cupping.
Percussion. (def. 1) From Jarvis, 1996.
auscultatory percussion auscultation of the sound produced by percussion.
immediate percussion that in which the blow is struck directly against the body surface.
mediate percussion that in which a pleximeter is used.
palpatory percussion a combination of palpation and percussion, affording tactile rather than auditory impressions.

per·cus·sion

(per-kŭsh'ŭn),
1. A diagnostic procedure designed to determine the density of a body part by the sound produced by tapping the surface with the finger or a plessor; performed primarily over the chest to determine presence of normal air content in the lungs and over the abdomen to evaluate air in the loops of intestine and the size of solid organs such as the liver and spleen.
2. A form of massage, consisting of repeated blows or taps of varying force.
[L. percussio, fr. per-cutio, pp. -cussus, to beat, fr. quatio, to shake, beat]

percussion

/per·cus·sion/ (per-kush´un) the act of striking a part with short, sharp blows as an aid in diagnosing the condition of the underlying parts by the sound obtained.
auscultatory percussion  auscultation of the sound produced by percussion.
immediate percussion  that in which the blow is struck directly against the body surface.
mediate percussion  that in which a pleximeter is used.
palpatory percussion  a combination of palpation and percussion, affording tactile rather than auditory impressions.

percussion

(pər-kŭsh′ən)
n.
1. The striking together of two bodies, especially when noise is produced.
2. The sound, vibration, or shock caused by the striking together of two bodies.
3. The act of detonating a percussion cap in a firearm.
4. A method of medical diagnosis in which various areas of the body, especially the chest, back, and abdomen, are tapped to determine by resonance the condition of internal organs.
5. Music
a. The section of a band or orchestra composed of percussion instruments.
b. Percussion instruments or their players considered as a group.

percussion

[pərkush′ən]
Etymology: L, percutere, to strike hard
a technique in physical examination of tapping the body with the fingertips or fist to evaluate the size, borders, and consistency of some of the internal organs and to discover the presence of and evaluate the amount of fluid in a body cavity. Immediate or direct percussion is percussion performed by striking the fingers directly on the body surface. Indirect, mediate, or finger percussion involves striking a finger of one hand on a finger of the other hand (normally the second phalanx of the third digit) as it is placed over the organ. See also cupping and vibrating, percussor, pleximeter. percuss, v., percussible, adj.
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Percussion: normal notes over the anterior

percussion

Alternative medicine
A massage technique that consists of chopping and drumming by the sides of the hand to “fleshy” tissues (e.g., the back, buttocks and thighs).

per·cus·sion

(pĕr-kŭsh'ŭn)
1. A diagnostic procedure designed to determine the density of a part by the sound produced by tapping the surface with the finger or a plessor; performed primarily over the chest to determine presence of normal air content in the lungs and over the abdomen to evaluate air in the loops of intestine.
2. A form of massage, consisting of repeated blows or taps of varying force.
[L. percussio, fr. per-cutio, pp. -cussus, to beat, fr. quatio, to shake, beat]

percussion

A technique used in examining the chest or the abdomen. A finger of one hand is pressed firmly on the part and tapped briskly with a finger of the other hand. The quality or resonance of the sound produced indicates whether the underlying area is air-filled, fluid-filled or solid.

Percussion

An assessment method in which the surface of the body is struck with the fingertips to obtain sounds that can be heard or vibrations that can be felt. It can determine the position, size, and consistency of an internal organ. It is done over the chest to determine the presence of normal air content in the lungs, and over the abdomen to evaluate air in the loops of the intestine.

per·cus·sion

(pĕr-kŭsh'ŭn)
Diagnostic procedure designed to determine density of a body part by sound produced by tapping surface with finger or plessor.
[L. percussio, fr. per-cutio, pp. -cussus, to beat, fr. quatio, to shake, beat]

percussion (perkush´ən),

n the act of striking an area, a structure, or an organ as an aid in diagnosing a diseased condition by the sensations reported by the patient and by the sounds heard by the examiner.

percussion

in veterinary diagnosis, striking a part of the body with short, sharp blows of the fingers in order to determine the size, position and density of the underlying parts by the sound obtained. Percussion is most commonly used on the chest and back for examination of the heart and lungs. For example, since the heart is not resonant and the adjacent lungs are, when the examiner's fingers strike the chest over the heart the sound waves will change in pitch. This serves as a guide to the precise location and size of the heart. The value of percussion in animals is limited by their haircoat, their reluctance to cooperate and their anatomy. Radiology and ultrasonographic imaging have pretty much supplanted the percussionist.

auscultatory percussion
auscultation of the sound produced by percussion. See also auscultation with percussion.
immediate percussion
that in which the blow is struck directly against the body surface.
mediate percussion
that in which a pleximeter is used.
palpatory percussion
a combination of palpation and percussion, affording tactile rather than auditory impressions. See also ballottement.
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