percolate

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percolate

 [per´ko-lāt]
1. to strain; to submit to percolation.
2. a liquid that has been submitted to percolation.
3. to trickle slowly through a substance.

percolate

/per·co·late/ (per´kah-lāt)
1. to strain; to submit to percolation.
2. to trickle slowly through a substance.
3. a liquid that has been submitted to percolation.

percolate

(pĕr′kō-lāt) [L. percolare, to strain through]
1. To allow a liquid to seep through a powdered substance.
2. Any fluid that has been filtered or percolated.
3. To strain a fluid through powdered substances in order to impregnate it with dissolved chemicals.

percolate

1. to strain; to submit to percolation.
2. a liquid that has been submitted to percolation.
3. to trickle slowly through a substance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Suppose a route consists of multiple percolation paths between the transceiver nodes, like the established multiple paths in Fig.
The proposed percolation based routing and data transmission can be used in many M2M communications, including but not limited to the following:
Percolation based routing and data transmission can work without any dedicated routers and servers, providing a low-cost, flexible and high efficient networking and data transmission deployment.
Even in the simplest case, that of the two-dimensional square lattice site percolation, does not exist nowadays an exact solution of the percolation problem, and no exact results are known on any kind of lattice in three dimensions [7].
Typical lattice size for percolation systems is about a million sites [7,8], these simulations are usually executed on super computers.
Under the sponsorship of VirtualDynamics the author of this investigation devised and developed a Percolation Monte Carlo simulation software, having the following features:
Therefore, the simplification of the complex fluid is reasonable, in order to analyze the rheological percolation behavior of CB in the multiphase matrix.
With the CB content increases in this composite system, the filler-filler interactions begin to dominate, and eventually lead to the percolation and the formation of a conducting interconnected structure.
To understand the relationship between the electrical conductivity and content of the CB in the blends, the percolation theory is used to be characteristic of a percolation system.
The percolation threshold can be estimated by the values of G at the plateau for different MWCNT concentrations, as shown in the insert.
Effect of Sample Preparation Procedure on the Percolation Threshold: Compression vs.
Both curves show the same trend and the corresponding percolation thresholds are also the same.