percolation


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percolation

 [per″ko-la´shun]
the extraction of soluble parts of a drug by passing a solvent liquid through it.

per·co·la·tion

(per'kō-lā'shŭn),
1. Synonym(s): filtration
2. Extraction of the soluble portion of a solid mixture by passing a solvent liquid through it.
3. Passage of saliva or other fluids into the interface between tooth structure and restoration; sometimes induced by thermal changes.
[L. percolatio, fr. per- + col, to strain]

percolation

/per·co·la·tion/ (per″kah-la´shun) the extraction of soluble parts of a drug by passing a solvent liquid through it.

percolation

[pur′kəlā′shən]
Etymology: L, percolare, to strain
1 the act of filtering any liquid through a porous medium.
2 (in pharmacology) the removal of the soluble parts of a crude drug by passing a liquid solvent through it.

per·co·la·tion

(pĕr'kŏ-lā'shŭn)
1. Synonym(s): filtration.
2. Extraction of the soluble portion of a solid mixture by passing a solvent liquid through it.
3. Passage of saliva or other fluids into the interface between tooth structure and restoration; sometimes induced by thermal changes.
[L. percolatio, fr. per- + colo, to strain]

percolation (perˈ·k·lāˑ·shn),

n a method for extracting essential oils from aromatic plant materials that strongly resembles steam distillation. As part of the process, a generator above the aromatic plant material produces steam. The steam then trickles down into the aromatic plant material, and the steam and oil are collected in the exact method used in steam distillation. This process is quicker and less complex than steam distillation. Also called
hydro-diffusion. See also steam distillation.
Enlarge picture
Percussion hammer.

per·co·la·tion

(pĕr'kŏ-lā'shŭn)
1. Passage of saliva or other fluids into interface between tooth structure and restoration.
2. Synonym(s): filtration.
[L. percolatio, fr. per- + col, to strain]

percolation,

n an extraction of the soluble parts of a drug by causing a liquid solvent to flow slowly through it.

percolation

the extraction of soluble parts of a drug by passing a solvent liquid through it.
References in periodicals archive ?
It would be desirable to change the conductive filler volume percent as an independent variable to establish the percolation behavior.
Section 2 introduces the related works of barrier coverage and percolation theory.
Similarly, applied water deep percolation during the irrigation season ranged from about 15 to 18 inches, with the average amount at the test sites a little over an inch greater than that at the control site.
It was found that before mixing of bentonite, all the water deep percolated before reaching at the tail and water traveled only 10 m along the field and water deep percolation depth was 0.
Therefore, the objectives of the study described here were to first, develop an empirical relationship between the saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks) of layered silt loam soils and their percolation times (PT) in order to understand the influence of individual layers; and second, to statistically compare this relationship with the equations developed by Winneberger (1974) and Fritton and co-authors (1986).
For two-scale simulations, it is interesting to estimate the percolation threshold of the smaller scale objects, keeping constant the volume fraction of the other objects (exclusion in the present case).
Keywords: Percolation, Infiltration, Monte Carlo, Computational, Simulational, Physics, Clusters.
Based on this the water content, [theta]', at which the accessible pore space forms an unblocked network and percolation can take place can be found by setting the mean path of separation, [chi], in Eqn 2 equal to the average separation length, [L.
Hence, considering the uncertainties regarding the IR polymer degradation and crosslinking during mixing and testing, a percolation threshold of 11 vol.
While a few example applications (determination of w/c and degree of hydration, assessment of percolation, computation of physical properties) have been discussed and presented in this paper, it is likely that other uses for this three-dimensional data will be discovered and implemented over time.
Soil water not used by plants can migrate through the soil profile as percolation, and eventually reach the groundwater table as recharge.
1989) compared [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] leaching potential (defined as soil water [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] concentration at 60-cm depth and calculated cumulative [MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] losses by percolation per unit area) among eight turfgrasses including six different species.