penetrating

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penetrating

(pĕn′ĕ-trāt-ĭng)
Entering beyond the exterior.

penetrating power

The capacity of a lens to see into an object.

penetrating

breaching the tissues of the body.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bohm argues persuasively that the basic moral configuration in Faust can be seen as structured by tropes familiar from the epistemology of epic: Mephistopheles leads Faust deeper into the seductions of curiositas and so towards the violation of sophia, represented by Gretchen and her penetratingly simple insights into his condition ("wie hast du's mit der Religion?
I was mortified that my appointment with the Judge had become so penetratingly unprofessional; I was certain that I would soon be off the project.
Binder's emotional observations are penetratingly honest but never sentimental, cathartic without being manipulative, offering tentative hope and healing rather than a pat sunny ending.
Obscured by the all too successful "strategy of concealment" are fragments of an immensely erudite and penetratingly insightful theory of culture, authority, and social change.
Heather Laird's utterly fascinating and penetratingly insightful work makes sense of this legal ascent from subversion to farce.
The PigTail's revolutionary, simple design earned it US Patent #6,312,030 for a food manipulating tool that allows you "to penetratingly skewer, hook, lift and/or turn and flip the food in a single, continuous, bi-axial thrusting and turning motion of the user's hand, wrist and arm.
The problems and nature of visual evidence are penetratingly dealt with in Sophie Harent's discussion of painting the city.
Gunder could be ornery and sweet, fatalistic yet hopeful that sensible arguments might eventually make a difference, penetratingly visionary and riveted to the mundane intricacies of international law, admired and despised.
Still, theological reflection on God's grace remains paralyzed and unable to penetratingly change surrounding culture.
Rather than simply catalogue portraits-in-novels, Conway offers a broader take on visual culture, to include the erotic tableaux of Manley's New Atalantis; the visualizing of Clarissa, with special reference to the portrait of her in Vandyke dress; Heywood's Betsy Thoughtless and Fielding's Amelia as characters who use the gaze surprisingly actively in pursuit of their own niche within the market that commodifies them as objects to be looked at; Sterne's uneasy use of women, from those who look penetratingly, such as Widow Wadman in Tristram Shandy, to the Sentimental Journey's gallery of passive beauties whose weeping eyes or ordinary looks offer solipsistic fantasy.
And in rendering Viirlaid's concrete poems, from "Hand in Hand," he gives a brightly inventive ring to the ending of the poem "Peculiar / beings," where "until Amen became no men" wonderfully reflects the embittered and sometimes sarcastically coarse-grained yet penetratingly humane world vision of Viirlaid's poems.
Tadao Sato, a Japanese film critic, penetratingly explores Japanese cinema by asking whether there is something "typically Japanese.