pelvic rotation


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rotation

 [ro-ta´shun]
1. the process of turning around an axis.
2. in obstetrics, the turning of the fetal head (or presenting part) for proper orientation to the pelvic axis. It should occur naturally, but if it does not it must be accomplished manually or instrumentally by the obstetrician or manually by the nurse-midwife.
3. a clinical assignment for students in a specific clinical area.
4. in dentistry, the turning of a malturned tooth into its proper position.
pelvic rotation movement of the pelvis around an imaginary axis.
site rotation the selection of sequential injection locations for a patient receiving multiple injections. A chart is frequently utilized to guide the nurse in rotating sites so that the same location is not used repeatedly, which would lead to tissue damage and irregular absorption of drugs.

pelvic rotation

one of the five major kinematic determinants of gait, involving the alternate rotation of the pelvis to the right and the left of the body's central axis. The usual pelvic rotation occurring at each hip joint in most healthy individuals is approximately 4 degrees to each side of the central axis. Pelvic rotation occurs during the stance phase of gait and involves a medial to lateral circular motion. During normal locomotion or walking, considered a progressive sinusoidal movement, pelvic rotation serves to minimize the vertical displacement of the body's center of gravity. Analysis of pelvic rotation is often a factor in diagnosis of various orthopedic diseases, deformities, and abnormal bone conditions and in the correction of pathological gaits. Compare knee-ankle interaction, knee-hip flexion, lateral pelvic displacement, pelvic tilt.
References in periodicals archive ?
Based on previous research it was hypothesised that an approach angle of 45[degrees] would significantly improve kicking accuracy and ball velocity, whilst altering kick kinematics, in particular increasing pelvic rotation.
the spinous process of S1) junction to record pelvic rotation and one at the mid point between the lateral femoral epicondyle and the greater trochanter to record thigh motion as previously described by Bull and McGregor (2000).
Kinematic variables were also observed to change, with greater pelvic rotation and associated lumbar spine motion at the later time point.