pelvic floor

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Related to pelvic floors: Pelvic floor muscles

pelvic floor

the soft tissues enclosing the pelvic outlet.

pelvic floor

A well-defined region bounded anteriorly by the pubis, posteriorly by the sacrum, laterally by the ischial and iliac bones, superiorly by the peritoneum, and inferiorly by the levator ani and coccygeus muscles, the last of which form the pelvic diaphragm.
 
Pelvic floor tissues
Uterus, adnexae, bladder, rectum, neurovascular tissues.

menopause

Change of life, climacteric, 'time of life'  Gynecology The cessation of menstrual activity due to failure to form ovarian follicles, which normally occurs age 45–50 Clinical Menstrual irregularity, vasomotor instability, 'hot flashes', irritability or psychosis, ↑ weight, painful breasts, dyspareunia, ↑/↓ libido, atrophy of urogenital epithelium and skin, ASHD, MI, strokes and osteoporosis–which can be lessened by HRT. See Estrogen replacement therapy, Hot flashes, Male menopause, Premature ovarian failure, Premature menopause. Cf Menarche.
Menopause–”…what a drag it is getting old.” Jagger, Richards
Bladder Cystourethritis, frequency/urgency, stress incontinence
Breasts ↓ Size, softer consistency, sagging
Cardiovascular Angina, ASHD, CAD
Endocrine Hot flashes
Mucocutaneous Atrophy, dryness, pruritus, facial hirsutism, dry mouth
Neurologic Psychological, sleep disturbances
Pelvic floor Uterovaginal prolapse
Skeleton  Osteoporosis, fractures, low back pain
Vagina Bloody discharge, dyspareunia, vaginitis
Vocal cords Deepened voice
Vulva  Atrophy, dystrophy, pruritus

pelvic floor

The connective tissues and muscles (including the coccygeus and the levator ani muscles) that lie beneath and support the perineum and pelvis. Weakening of the tissues of the pelvic floor can occur during childbirth or after radiation, surgery, or trauma to the pelvis, resulting in pelvic floor disorders such as organ prolapse or urinary or fecal incontinence. Synonym: pelvic diaphragm; pelvic support
See also: floor
References in periodicals archive ?
Yes, it's in a region that adjoins your core muscles, but a strong core doesn't automatically equate to a strong pelvic floor.
There are numerous muscles that make up the core, the deeper stability muscles (transverse abdominis, multifidus and the pelvic floor muscles) and the larger global muscles (obliques, rectus abdominis and gluteus maximus),' says Holly.
Often when people work on their core, they focus too much on their can strain the pelvic floor and increase their chance of developing dysfunction.
The pelvic floor also has a role in sexual pleasure, stability of the pelvis and lower back, maintaining bowel continence, and assists in labour by helping the baby's head turn," Holly adds.
Women notice greater sensation and better orgasms during sex after working their pelvic floor muscles, too," added Becky.
FOR WOMEN To identify your pelvic floor muscles, squeeze the muscles that you use to stop your urine flow.
Slowly tighten your pelvic floor muscles under the bladder as hard as you can.
FOR MEN To identify your pelvic floor muscles, sit relaxing the muscles of the thighs, bottom and abdomen.
There's good robust evidence that physiotherapy - exercises targeted to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles - will improve symptoms for 75% of people with bladder incontinence," says Becky Aston.
Men suffering with bladder weakness or difficulty establishing or maintaining an erection should also find that pelvic floor exercises help.
My pelvic floor wasn't as strong after having children, but 20 years ago it was still taboo to talk about it, even with my midwife.
Now researchers are urging doctors recommend pelvic floor exercises straight away to patients who are impotent.