pedipalp


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Related to pedipalp: book lung, Cheliped, Coxal gland, chelicerae

pedipalp

(pĕd′ə-pălp′)
n.
One of the second pair of appendages near the mouth of a chelicerate, such as a spider or horseshoe crab, used for various reproductive, predatory, or sensory functions.

pedipalp

either member of the second pair of head appendages of arachnids, specialized for different functions in different forms. For example, seizing prey in scorpions, locomotion in king crabs, fertilization in male spiders (where the tip becomes a specialized container for sperm transfer), squeezing and chewing food, or for sensory purposes.
References in periodicals archive ?
sisyphoides' evolution, the species probably couldn't afford to reduce pedipalp size too much, says Irschick.
Genital acetabula five pairs; female genital field with two pairs of acetabular plates; anterior female plates with a slightly elongate, inner flap that is heavily sclerotized and bears one or two, short, thick, spinous, setae; posterior female plate unmodified; pedipalp subcylindrical and well-sclerotized with tarsus usually elongate quadrate in outline with large, obvious clawlets; dorsum with obvious dorsal plates; male genital field as in Polyatax; male fourth walking leg modified, especially genu, but the tibia is essentially unmodified; tarsal claws of walking legs bifid; coxal plates with obvious borders.
Male pedipalps and female epigynes were dissected from some of the specimens for more detailed examination.
Female genital field with two pairs of acetabular plates, and each plate similar in shape and apparently unmodified and bearing usually two or three acetabula; anterior female acetabular plates with two, long, inner setae, posterior plates with a single, long, inner seta; all four female acetabular plates closely appressed to one another with setae forming a central mass; male genital field with a single pair of acetabular plates forming a nearly circular field that is on the venter or absolutely posterior by not extending up onto the dorsum, and lacking thick setae or spines; pedipalps subcylindrical and well sclerotized; male and female walking legs similar and lacking obvious sexual dimorphism; typical species have large, moveable spines on tubercles on the first walking leg.
Pedipalps brown; palpal tibia with forked retrolateral apophysis, ventral prong longer and with curved tip, and smaller tooth-like dorsal apophysis (Figs 133-136); embolus originating proximally on prolateral side, tip directed retrolaterally (Fig.
Intact scorpion carcasses and exuvia were photographed, and the following exoskeletal characteristics were recorded for each specimen: 1) curvature of the mesosoma and metasoma; 2) presence or absence of telescoped mesosomal and metasomal segments; 3) position/orientation of the chelicerae; 4) position/orientation of the walking legs; and 5) position/orientation of the pedipalps.
Pedipalps dark, tibial apophysis curved (Figs 203, 204), bulb dark brown, anterior haematodocha clearly separated, embolus short (Fig.
This species clearly belongs to Australomimetus as it shares in the male the typical conformation of the pedipalp which includes a slender cymbium without appendages (Fig.
2, table 1) proposed a number of diagnostic characters for the Zoicinae, two of which, regarding the male pedipalp, clearly represent synapomorphies for the subfamily: the lack of a median (= tegular) apophysis and the distal origin of the embolus.
pterygocercus using four characters: trichobothrial pattern, dentition of the anal arc, pectinal tooth counts, and number of subrows of denticles on the pedipalp fingers.