pediculicide


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pediculicide

 [pĕ-dik´u-lĭ-sīd]
destroying lice.
an agent that destroys lice.

pe·dic·u·li·cide

(pĕ-dik'yū-li-sīd),
An agent used to destroy lice.
[L. pediculus, louse, + caedo, to kill]

pediculicide

/pe·dic·u·li·cide/ (pĕ-dik´u-lĭ-sīd)
1. destroying lice.
2. an agent that destroys lice.

pediculicide

[pədik′yoo͡lisīd′]
Etymology: L, pediculus, little foot, caedere, to kill
any of a group of drugs that kill lice.

pe·dic·u·li·cide

(pĕ-dik'yū-li-sīd)
A chemical agent used to kill lice.
[L. pediculus, louse, + caedo, to kill]

pediculicide

1. destroying lice.
2. an agent that destroys lice.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thousands of bottles have been sold, and an abundance of satisfied customers attest to the success of the product, especially in cases for which pyrethrin-permethrin based pediculicides h ave failed.
Consumers who purchase over-the-counter pediculicides can expect to see changes to the outside label that are aimed at improving the success rate of these lice treatments.
As we move our pediculicide compound through Phase III trials and continue developing the rest of our portfolio, we welcome the guidance and global connections that CM Capital can offer.
com, a leading national head lice treatment service, have long maintained that common chemical treatments for head lice removal, which are known as pediculicides, are becoming less effective in eradicating head lice.
These differences can result from surveys being conducted during different seasons, various examination techniques, reporting of active infestation or presence of nits, and potential introduction of effective pediculicides.
A The British Medical Journal recently published a study which concluded that the Bug Buster treatment method - wet combing with conditioner - was the most effective over-the-counter treatment for head louse infestation in the community when compared with pediculicides (lotions, shampoos or rinses for the treatment of headlice which contain insecticides).
Use over-the-counter pediculicides (lice-killing shampoos) for two treatments about 8 to 10 days apart; some lice may be resistant to shampoo chemicals.
Enter any drug store in Boston area and you are likely to see shelves filled with head lice chemical treatments; according to Beck, common chemical treatments for head lice treatment, which are known as pediculicides, are becoming less effective in eradicating head lice.
Body lice may also respond to oral or topically applied pediculicides, although none of these agents are labeled or marketed for treatment of body lice in the United States.
Body lice also may respond to oral or topically applied pediculicides, although none of these agents are labeled or marketed for treatment of body lice in the United States.
Unfortunately, some parent are just not able to get rid of the lice that are immune to a lot of the so called pediculicides out there.
Lice have developed a resistance to chemical pediculicides, so the old model no longer works.