pederast


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pederast

 [ped´er-ast]
one who practices pederasty.

ped·er·ast

(ped'ĕr-ăst),
One who practices pederasty.

pederast

(ped′ĕ-rast″) [Gr. paiderastēs, a lover of boys]
A man who indulges in anal intercourse with young boys.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Athenian pederast remains silent, but still amazed ([TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII].
As the festivities commence, Agathon, an effeminate, cross-dressing pederast, (104) releases his slaves, inviting them to behave as if they were his masters.
Yet in a purely social sense, they were necessary to him, because their presence in his life assured the safety of his secret: if he were known as a rake and a ladies' man, he could never be suspected of being a pederast.
2) Voltaire chose [the name Bulgare] to represent the Prussians of Frederick the Great because he had reason to think that Frederick was a pederast and because the French bougre, like the English "bugger," comes from (Bulgare) Bulgarian (Frame 99).
But he remained self-deluded; as he wrote to one of them, "Don't call me a pederast, it hurts my feelings.
Hector is a mild pederast - but no paedophile who molests children.
But while Peter Whitmore may be the most notorious pederast in the country today, an investigation by the Western Standard shows that there are many more Peter Whitmores at large--men with a long history of sexual attacks on children, rotated in and out of prison, but now living free.
By far the most shocking and suspenseful scene (maybe the only one) involves Gabriel being mistaken for a pederast, which is so not the case.
They can manufacture lying or scandalous stories about your opponent: an anti-Semite, a drug addict, a pederast, a C.
From Fritz Lang's 1931 film, "M," starring Peter Lorre as a homicidal pederast, to Pedro Almodovar's recent film, "Bad Education," about priestly indiscretions with young boys, an ample filmography suggests that this subject fascinates even as it repels people.
The revelation that Count Szembek was indeed a cruising homosexual and perhaps a pederast confirms that Conrad's tale is indeed "well-bred" in that the double narrative constitutes, as we now recognize, a "little trick" (CL4, p.
33) While there is no apparently acceptable punishment for these types of crimes (for example, abusing a pederast's own child or abusing the pederast himself are obviously unacceptable punishments), Kant is also clear that these crimes nonetheless merit punishment and such punishment cannot be left to the vagaries of the individual judge's will.