pectinases

pectinases

ENZYMES which degrade PECTIN. Broadly there are two types: pectinesterases, which produce methanol and pectic acid, and pectic depolymerases, which hydrolyse GLYCOSIDIC BONDS in the various components of pectin. They are found in a wide range of MICROORGANISMS.
References in periodicals archive ?
Some mutant strains of Aspergillus niger overproduced pectinases when compared to wild type fungal strains in different media.
Among the topics are sucrose-transforming enzymes: hydrolysis and isomerization, pectinases and their biotechnological applications, the role of intrinsic and supplemented enzymes in brewing and beer properties, microbial linamerase in cassava fermentation, and extremophiles as potential resources for food processing enzymes.
The use of commercial pectinase in the fruit juice industry, part 2: determination of the kinetic behavior of immobilized commercial pectinases.
Green Worx formulates green cleaning products using a combination of specially selected bacterial strains, with an extensive range of natural enzymes comprising proteases, lipases, amylases, cellulases, mannanases and pectinases, said Frost & Sullivan Research Analyst, Kimberley Bryant.
Mostly, 75% commercial enzymes are hydrolases including carbohydrases, proteases, pectinases and lipases.
The enzyme production is primarily reported in various fungal species however, some bacterial strains have also been found capable of producing pectinases (Jayani et al.
Pectinases were the first enzymes which were used in the fruit-processing industry; their initial application had been reported already in the 1930s [3,4].
Chamier AC, Dixon PA (1982) Pectinases in leaf degradation by aquatic hyphomycetes in: The field study the colonizationpattern of aquatic hyphomycetes on leaf packs in a surrey stream.
There were 21 cellulases, 6 xylanases belonging to GH5 family and two arabinanases and pectinases each from GH43 and GH28 families, respectively (Table 1).
Pectinases are a big group of enzymes that break down hectic polysaccharides of plant tissues into simpler molecules [8].