payoff table

payoff table

a table showing the financial returns minus costs for each of the strategies under consideration.
References in periodicals archive ?
In addition to receiving a description of the payoff function (Equation 1), individuals were also given a payoff table indicating their payoff for each level of private contribution and a level of aggregate contributions by others.
The first, we construct a payoff table for objectives.
To see the advantage of being the leader in a Stackelberg game, consider a simple game with the payoff table as shown in figure 3.
Table 1 Win-Lose Table A B C D E Total units Proportion Proportion Proportion Proportion (coins) of Players of Players of Players of who staked in a who who who experience single play experience experience experience less than session ** better than between 80 between 60 60 per cent 100 per & 100 & 80 per return of cent return percent cent return total of total return of of total amount amount total amount staked staked amount staked staked 2000 29% 46% 22% 3% 3000 25% 54% 20% 1% 4000 22% 61% 17% 0% 5000 19% 66% 15% 0% 6000 17% 71% 12% 0% 8000 14% 77% 9% 0% 10000 11% 82% 7% 0% ** Assumes all games played on a single line with one coin staked per game Table 2 Payoff Table for "Red, White & Blue" Slot Machine Win Pays Combinations Probability Red 7, white 7.
In my previous column (Jan/Feb 2005, The Physician Executive), I discussed the use of the payoff table as a tool to assist in making rational choices when faced with this uncertainty.
Experimental subjects were confronted with identical payoffs: 50 cents for each player whenever the first mover chose [bar]T (corresponds to choosing alternative A in the experimental payoff table in Appendix C); $1.
A built-in payoff table sets the amount a player gets for a given winning combination.
In the first part of the experiment, subjects were given a Payoff Table showing the individual profits accruing to any participant as a function of the number of entrants and then asked to make only an entry decision.
This problem is also apparent in Holt's payoff table, where any output pair summing to 24 constitutes a CCE with a profit level of 45.
Each party's payoff table has roughly 200 possible combinations of X and Y over which he or she can bargain.