pathogen


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pathogen

 [path´o-jen]
any disease-producing agent or microorganism. adj., adj pathogen´ic.

path·o·gen

(path'ō-jen),
Any virus, microorganism, or other substance causing disease.
[patho- + G. -gen, to produce]

pathogen

/patho·gen/ (path´ah-jen) any disease-producing agent or microorganism.pathogen´ic

pathogen

(păth′ə-jən)
n.
An agent that causes disease, especially a virus, bacterium, or fungus.

pathogen

[path′əjən]
Etymology: Gk, pathos, disease, genein, to produce
any microorganism capable of producing disease. pathogenic, adj.

pathogen

Any disease-producing microorganism.

pathogen

Popularly, bug Any disease-producing microorganism. See Blood-borne pathogen, Emerging pathogen, Food-borne pathogen, Intracellular pathogen, Water-borne pathogen.

path·o·gen

(path'ŏ-jĕn)
Any virus, microorganism, or other substance that causes disease.
[patho- + G. -gen, to produce]

pathogen

Any agent that causes disease, especially a micro-organism.

pathogen

or

pathogene

any organism that causes disease, such as a virus, bacterium or fungus.

Pathogen

Any disease-producing agent or microorganism.

pathogen

microorganism (bacteria, fungus or virus) capable of overcoming host resistance, to cause disease

path·o·gen

(path'ŏ-jĕn)
Any virus, microorganism, or other substance causing disease.
[patho- + G. -gen, to produce]

pathogen (path´ojən),

n a microorganism responsible for causing disease.
pathogen, opportunistic,
n an infectious agent that can only cause disease when the host's resistance is low.

pathogen

any disease-producing agent or microorganism.

pathogen risk factors
risk factors dependent on the characteristics of the pathogen, e.g. virulence or persistence in the environment of a bacterium or virus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Human activities may also be a source of wildlife infection, which could create new reservoirs of human pathogens.
For example, before applying manure to the fields, farmers must compost or treat it to remove pathogens.
0 for those with only exposure to oral pathogens, said Dr.
For example, a treatment was classified as a failure if any sign of residual infection remained in a patient who did not undergo follow-up testing to determine whether the residual bacteria represented the original pathogen or a new organism.
Nestle tries to justify yoking the two issues by claiming that the debate over GM foods, like that over foodborne pathogens, is at the root of a debate over food safety.
Contact with urine and stool should be avoided, because other pathogens (such as CMV or diarrhea causative agents) can be spread via these fluids.
A review of the literature suggests that, in terms of risk, significant concentrations of human pathogens could be expected in sludges applied to agricultural land.
Luckily, barberry is extremely rare in this country, and there is no evidence that it has played any role in creating new strains of the pathogen.
They have published widely on the control of foodborne pathogens.
Decades ago, scientists began wondering how breast milk stops the pathogens that cause diarrhea.
Much more research is needed on wastewater and on treatment to control pathogen risks.
If approved, the Intercept Platelet System will be the only system commercially available to enhance the safety of platelet transfusions through pathogen inactivation.