paternalism

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Related to paternalistically: anesthetizing
Forensics The interacting with a patient as a father would with a child—e.g., surrogate decision-making, which may limit autonomy or be contrary to the patient’s wishes
NIHspeak Making decisions for others against or apart from their wishes with the intent of doing them good

paternalism

(pă-tĕr-năl-ĭzm)
A type of medical decision making in which health care professionals exercise unilateral authority over patients. When patients are competent to make their own choices and health care professionals seek to act in the patients' best interests, shared decision making is preferable, because it encourages dialogue, preserves autonomy, fosters responsibility, and allows for adaptation.

paternalism (p·terˑ·nl·izm),

n a conflict between beneficence and auton-omy, such as when a practitioner ignores the choice that a patient makes because he or she feels that more good can be done by the practitioner's judgment. See also beneficence and autonomy.
References in periodicals archive ?
In short, why cannot legislators paternalistically pursue what is in citizens' aretaic interests, even though that may mean that they will indirectly inhibit what citizens would otherwise have deontic rights to do?
In the older days, meaning until relatively recently, medical decisions were made paternalistically by doctors.
In high PD societies, superiors are expected to lead, to make decisions autocratically and paternalistically, and subordinates are generally afraid and unwilling to disagree with their superiors [2, p.
Like its historical antecedents, 1990s populism is a curious blend of left and right, of local versus national politics (though the right wing of 1990s populism has paternalistically seized upon the theme of "the community" for its own purposes).
Neither do we need allies who will paternalistically seek to set the timetable for our freedom.
Parents, and more specifically fathers in their traditional role, have acted paternalistically for ages without thinking such behavior morally suspect.
Those who paternalistically argue that such an arrangement could provide relative protection for the people against the harsher consequences of their collective decision may be at best well meaning but it is a denial of politics.
However, this motivation is far from a clear-cut explanation for the extent of family breakup in the slave trade, especially considering that some historians have argued that slave owners generally acted paternalistically to preserve family units and expended great effort and resources to protect the slaves they owned.
Professor Paul Starr, for example, attributes the rise of medical authority to the social origins of professional sovereignty, (14) and Jeffrey Berlant observes that the foothills of the first Code of Ethics for the American Medical Association (AMA) was motivated by writers who believed that "the Enlightenment and rationality were available only to elites paternalistically bound to assuming the burden of protecting the public [and thus] the only conceivable authority in medical matters was the practicing medical profession.
In addition, a stronger penalty regime could as easily accomplish the same result, without paternalistically precluding taxpayers from consenting to the disclosure of their return information or making economic choices.
The state is not acting paternalistically if it requires motorcyclists to wear helmets in order to save medical costs (although we think that such arguments are often smokescreens for paternalism).
Places with fewer checks and balances, like Nazi Germany or Soviet Russia, turned to paternalistically justified pro-state policies with awful results.