patellofemoral joint


Also found in: Acronyms.

pa·tel·lo·fem·or·al joint

(pă-tel'ō-fem'ŏr-ăl joynt)
The sliding articulation between the patella and the distal femur.
See also: knee complex

patellofemoral joint

; PFJ cartilaginous joint between deep aspect of patella and anterior inferior aspect of femur and anterior superior aspect of tibia
References in periodicals archive ?
However, it remains uncertain whether increasing the applied quadriceps muscle load would have resulted in increased contact pressures in the patellofemoral joint [43], as Eilerman et al.
It has been recognized that motion of the tibia and femur in the transverse and frontal planes may have an effect on the patellofemoral joint mechanics (19).
An MRI with this technique certainly helps one evaluate the articular surface of the patellofemoral joint.
MacIntyre NJ, Hill NA, Fellows RA, Ellis RE, Wilson DR (2006) Patellofemoral joint kinematics in individuals with and without patellofemoral pain syndrome.
Addressing abnormal patellofemoral joint stresses, which are thought to be due to lateral tracking of the patella, is usually an integral part of any treatment strategy, with methods such as patella taping and quadriceps strengthening typically used.
Introduction: A commonly cited theory states that patellofemoral pain is the result of elevated patellofemoral joint reaction forces (PFJRF's) that contribute to excessive joint stress and cartilage pathology.
Research shows traditional non-impact cardio machines can cause patellofemoral joint stress at levels equivalent to squats, stair climbing and lunges
The patella is constrained in the patellofemoral joint during the flexion cycle by a complex interplay between bony restraints and other primary stabilizers (ligamentous and bony anatomy of the knee), secondary stabilizers (such as the quadriceps musculature), position of the tibial tubercle, and the overall coronal and rotational alignment of the lower extremity.
The majority of these involve the patellofemoral joint.
Specifically, strong quadriceps muscles protected the patellofemoral joint from cartilage loss and did not worsen its loss in the tibiofemoral joint in both men and women.
Stress on any or all of these patellofemoral joint structures may lead to a conscious perception of pain (Crossley, Bennell, Green, Cowan & McConnell, 2002).