pastil


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pas·til

, pastille (pas'til, pas-tēl'),
1. A small mass of benzoin and other aromatic substances to be burned for fumigation.
2. Synonym(s): troche
[Fr. pastille; L. pastillus, a roll (of bread), dim. of panis, bread]

pas·tille

, pastil (pas-tēl', pas'til)
1. A small mass of benzoin and other aromatic substances to be burned for fumigation.
2. Synonym(s): troche.
[Fr. pastille; L. pastillus, a roll (of bread), dim. of panis, bread]
References in classic literature ?
I will go on examining authorities and reporting progress until she is well enough to get me out of this scrape by presiding herself.
These are not vague inferences drawn from supposed or speculative defects in a Constitution, the whole power of which is lodged in the hands of a people, or their representatives and delegates, but they are solid conclusions, drawn from the natural and necessary progress of human affairs.
And as with these examples I have reached Italy, which has been ruled for many years by mercenaries, I wish to discuss them more seriously, in order that, having seen their rise and progress, one may be better prepared to counteract them.
Our heavy frocks soon became completely saturated with water, and by their weight, and that of the articles we had concealed beneath them, not a little impeded our progress.
The rope drags, either on land or sea, while the balloon is free ; the latter, consequently, is always in advance, when any progress whatever is made : a comparison, therefore, by means of the compass, of the relative positions of the two objects, will always indicate the course.
Some day the study of metabolism may progress so far as to enable us to accept structural changes proceeding from an intellectual or moral base.
When they have allotted three years from the time of puberty to other parts of education, they are then of a proper age to submit to labour and a regulated diet; for it is impossible for the mind and body both to labour at the same time, as they are productive of contrary evils to each other; the labour of the body preventing the progress of the mind, and the mind of the body.
President and Directors, the sentiment of the masses of my race when I say that in no way have the value and manhood of the American Negro been more fittingly and generously recognized than by the managers of this magnificent Exposition at every stage of its progress.
She did not realize the significance of this war, though Dessalles with whom she constantly conversed was passionately interested in its progress and tried to explain his own conception of it to her, and though the "God's folk" who came to see her reported, in their own way, the rumors current among the people of an invasion by Antichrist, and though Julie (now Princess Drubetskaya), who had resumed correspondence with her, wrote patriotic letters from Moscow.
To his intense chagrin he soon found that his leg was more badly injured than he had thought, and that its condition seriously impeded his progress.
He found the young man intelligent far beyond his most sanguine hopes, so that the progress made was little short of uncanny.
Real progress was made and the boy's calculations were faultless.