pasteurization


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Related to pasteurization: Louis Pasteur, sterilization

pasteurization

 [pas″ter-i-za´shun]
the process of heating milk or other liquids, e.g., wine or beer, to destroy microorganisms that would cause spoilage. The milk is held at 62°C for 30 minutes (LTHM, low temperature holding method, holding method), or heated rapidly to 80°C and held for 15–30 seconds (HTST, high temperature short time, flash method), and then chilled. The procedure kills most pathogenic bacteria while retaining the flavor of the liquid.

pas·teur·i·za·tion

(pas'tūr-i-zā'shŭn),
The heating of milk, wines, fruit juices, etc., for about 30 minutes at 68°C (154.4°F) whereby living bacteria are destroyed, but the flavor or bouquet is preserved; the spores are unaffected but are kept from developing by immediately cooling the liquid to 10°C (50°F) or lower.
See also: sterilization.
[L. Pasteur]

pasteurization

/pas·teur·iza·tion/ (pas″cher-ĭ-za´shun) heating of milk or other liquids to moderate temperature for a definite time, often 60°C. for 30 min., which kills most pathogenic bacteria and considerably delays other bacterial development.

pasteurization

(păs′chər-ĭ-zā′shən, păs′tər-)
n.
1. The act or process of heating a food, especially a beverage such as milk or beer, to a specific temperature for a specific period of time in order to kill microorganisms that could cause disease, spoilage, or undesired fermentation.
2. The act or process of destroying most microorganisms in certain foods, such as raw meat or fresh fruits and vegetables, by irradiating them with gamma rays or other radiation to prevent spoilage.

pasteurization

[pas′tərīzā′shən]
Etymology: Louis Pasteur; Gk, izein, to cause
the process of applying heat, usually to milk or cheese, for a specified period for the purpose of killing or retarding the development of pathogenic bacteria. pasteurize, v.

pas·teur·i·za·tion

(pastyŭr-ī-zāshŭn)
The heating of milk, wines, and fruit juice for about 30 minutes at 68°C (154.4°F), whereby living bacteria are destroyed but the flavor or bouquet is preserved; the spores are unaffected but are kept from developing by immediately cooling the liquid to 10°C (50°F) or lower.
See also: sterilization
Synonym(s): pasteurisation.
[L. Pasteur]

pasteurization

A method of destroying infective micro-organisms in milk and other liquid foods. The liquid is rapidly heated to about 78 C and maintained at that temperature for fifteen seconds. It is then rapidly cooled to below 10 C. (Louis Pasteur, 1822–1895, French pioneer of bacteriology).

pasteurization

a method devised by Louis PASTEUR of partially sterilizing certain foods such as milk (by heating to 62 °C for 30 mins) before distribution. Heating destroys many harmful bacteria, including those responsible for tuberculosis. Nowadays, milk is generally pasteurized using higher temperatures (at least 72 °C, for at least 15 seconds); this is known as flash pasteurization or high-temperature short-time (HTST) pasteurization. This treatment not only kills pathogens but also reduces total bacterial counts, so that the milk will keep well in a refrigerator.

Pasteurization

The process of applying heat, usually to milk or cheese, for the purpose of killing, or retarding the development of, pathogenic bacteria.

Pasteur,

Louis, French chemist and bacteriologist, 1822-1895.
Pasteurella
Pasteurella aerogenes - species found in swine that can cause human wound infections following a pig bit.
Pasteurella multocida - bacterial species associated with dogs and cats.
Pasteurella pestis - Synonym(s): Yersinia pseudotuberculosis
Pasteurella "SP" - a rarely encountered organism that can cause infection after a guinea pig bite
Pasteurella tularensis - Synonym(s): Francisella tularensis
Pasteur effect - the inhibition of fermentation by oxygen, first observed by Pasteur.
Pasteur pipette - a cotton-plugged, glass tube drawn out to a fine tip, used for the sterile transfer of small volumes of fluid.
Pasteur vaccine
pasteurellosis - infection with bacteria of Pasteurella.
pasteurization - bacteria destruction process.
pasteurizer - pasteurization apparatus.

pas·teur·i·za·tion

(pastyŭr-ī-zāshŭn)
The heating of milk, wines, and fruit juices, for about 30 minutes at 68°C (154.4°F) whereby living bacteria are destroyed.
Synonym(s): pasteurisation.
[L. Pasteur]

pasteurization

the process of heating milk to destroy pathogenic microorganisms and delay the development of spoilage organisms. The holding method heats milk to at least 62.8°C (145°F) and holds it at that temperature for not less than 30 minutes. High-temperature short-time (HTST) pasteurization heats to 71.7°C (161°F) for at least 15 seconds. Ultrapasteurization heats to 88.3°C (191°F) for 1 second or 100°C (212°F) for 0.01 seconds.
References in periodicals archive ?
He said that most of the countries are following pasteurization
The milk is instantly cooled to 5C (41F) or below after pasteurization treatments.
31) So, while all states require the pasteurization of milk sold to the final consumer, (32) most states have carved out some type of exception permitting certain sales or transfers of raw milk to the final consumer, usually under a narrow set of circumstances.
All the participants lauded the effort of UVAS for the new initiatives in minimum pasteurization law in dairy sector.
Pasteurization DOES NOT reduce milk's nutritional value.
Pasteurization, or controlled heat, has been a particularly beneficial treatment from a food safety standpoint and is now required for many liquid foods such as milk and fruit and vegetable juices [13].
This not only includes the equipment used in filling, spawning and casing, but it also includes a thorough post crop steamoff to ensure pasteurization of the beds and the house itself.
We are very pleased that the FDA has finalized the 2009 PMO, which sets meaningfulcriteria for UV water pasteurization and disinfection in U.
0 logs obtained by HTST pasteurization for 26 seconds at 72 C.
Existing pasteurization technology removes heat-sensitive pathogens, but some heat-resistant spoilage microorganisms can survive.
Although the sale of raw milk was illegal in 26 states as of 2006, the authors note that those who are opposed to pasteurization have found ways to circumvent the law and obtain raw milk.
gabonensis, and its interaction with pasteurization temperature and pasteurization time on the sensory attributes and shelf life of palmwine as processed in Essien Udim Local Go vernment Area, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria using response surface methodology.