pasteurellosis


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pasteurellosis

 [pas″ter-ĕ-lo´sis]
infection with organisms of the genus Pasteurella.

pas·teur·el·lo·sis

(pas'tūr-ĕ-lō'sis),
Infection with bacteria of the genus Pasteurella.

pasteurellosis

/pas·teur·el·lo·sis/ (pas″ter-ĕ-lo´sis) infection with organisms of the genus Pasteurella.

pasteurellosis

[pas′tərelō′sis]
Etymology: Louis Pasteur
a local wound infection, caused by the gram-negative bacillus Pasteurella multicide, which may be acquired through the bite or scratch of an infected animal, usually a cat.

pasteurellosis

A nonspecific term used to dignify an infection (regardless of species of organism being infected) by the genus Pasteurella (regardless of the species infecting).

pas·teur·el·lo·sis

(pas'tūr-e-lō'sis)
Infection with bacteria of the genus Pasteurella.

Pasteurellosis

A bacterial infection caused by Pasteurella multocida. Pasteurellosis is characterized by inflammation around the wound site and may be accompanied by bacteria in the bloodstream and infection in tissues and organs.

Pasteur,

Louis, French chemist and bacteriologist, 1822-1895.
Pasteurella
Pasteurella aerogenes - species found in swine that can cause human wound infections following a pig bit.
Pasteurella multocida - bacterial species associated with dogs and cats.
Pasteurella pestis - Synonym(s): Yersinia pseudotuberculosis
Pasteurella "SP" - a rarely encountered organism that can cause infection after a guinea pig bite
Pasteurella tularensis - Synonym(s): Francisella tularensis
Pasteur effect - the inhibition of fermentation by oxygen, first observed by Pasteur.
Pasteur pipette - a cotton-plugged, glass tube drawn out to a fine tip, used for the sterile transfer of small volumes of fluid.
Pasteur vaccine
pasteurellosis - infection with bacteria of Pasteurella.
pasteurization - bacteria destruction process.
pasteurizer - pasteurization apparatus.

pas·teur·el·lo·sis

(pas'tur-e-lō'sis)
Infection with bacteria of the genus Pasteurella.

pasteurellosis

infection with organisms of the genera Pasteurella and Mannheimia. In animals includes septicemic pasteurellosis, pneumonic pasteurellosis, both of cattle, snuffles in rabbits and pasteurellosis of swine, sheep and goats. The causative bacteria include Pasteurella multocida types A, B, C and D, and Mannheimiahaemolytica.

epidemic pasteurellosis
see hemorrhagic septicemia.
ovine, porcine and caprine pasteurellosis
the more common pneumonic disease is caused by Mannheimia haemolytica and the septicemic disease by Pasteurella trehalosi.
pneumonic pasteurellosis
the common pasteurellosis of cattle caused by Mannheimiahaemolytica and sometimes Pasteurella multocida type A. Characterized by acute bronchopneumonia with fever, dyspnea, abnormal breath sounds, weak cough, severe toxemia and death in 24 to 48 hours.
septicemic pasteurellosis
see hemorrhagic septicemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
A severe systemic infection is the third and least common form of Pasteurellosis.
Because pasteurellosis is typically acquired by bite and scratch wounds, the risk of contracting pasteurellosis is good especially since there are more than 100 million dogs and cats in the United States (half of all Americans will be bitten in their lifetime).
Signs of pasteurellosis are variable, and include nasal and ocular discharge, genital swelling, dermal ulcerations, weight loss, or sudden death.
Isolation and characterisation of the causative agent of pasteurellosis, Photobacterium damsela subsp, piscicida, from sole.
Pneumonic pasteurellosis is caused by Pasteurella multocida, a-gram negative bacterium widespread in the industry.
Colibacillosis has been known to kill green finches, siskins, chaffinches and blue tits, while a wide range of birds are susceptible to pasteurellosis and yersiniosis.
Parrot disease, Q fever and pasteurellosis are among little-known diseases transmitted by pets, and the site tells of a case in which a primary school boy was mistakenly diagnosed as having influenza but after going through various hospitals it was discovered he had Q fever.
multocida is involved in avian pasteurellosis (fowl cholera) in feedyard playas; however, bovine isolates were avirulent when injected into mallard ducks.
Also called cholera of fowls, roup of fowls, hemorrhagic septicemia of fowls, avian pasteurellosis, cholera gallinarium, pasteurellosis, chicken septicemia, acute fowl cholera.
Diseases of feedlot lambs Disease Cause Signs Coccidiosis Three to four types of Diarrhea coccidia peculiar to sheep Bloody feces Salmonellosis Salmonella organisms Depression Diarrhea Elevated temperature Pasteurellosis Several organisms Forced breathing (Pneumonia) including pasteurella Nasal discharge Elevated temperature Enterotoxemia Clostridium perfringens Sudden death (Overeating) Type D Depression Convulsion Contagious Ecthyma Virus Lesions on lips, muzzle, udder, foot, head Polioencephalamocia Acute thiamine deficiency Blindness Circling Depression Watery eyes Listeriosis L.
Other infections contributing to the high mortality in the epizootic included nonspecific pneumonia, pasteurellosis, contagious caprine pleuropneumonia, contagious pustular dermatitis, bluetongue, and complications of mange and foot rot (Field Mission of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, unpublished data, 1998).
For the other infectious diseases, malignant edema was recorded - 2 cases, salmonellosis - 3 cases, pasteurellosis (cattle) - 13 cases, emphysematous carbuncle (EMCAR) - 7 cases, American bee feces - 1 case, enterotoxemia of sheep - 43 cases.