pasteurellosis


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pasteurellosis

 [pas″ter-ĕ-lo´sis]
infection with organisms of the genus Pasteurella.

pas·teur·el·lo·sis

(pas'tūr-ĕ-lō'sis),
Infection with bacteria of the genus Pasteurella.

pasteurellosis

/pas·teur·el·lo·sis/ (pas″ter-ĕ-lo´sis) infection with organisms of the genus Pasteurella.

pasteurellosis

[pas′tərelō′sis]
Etymology: Louis Pasteur
a local wound infection, caused by the gram-negative bacillus Pasteurella multicide, which may be acquired through the bite or scratch of an infected animal, usually a cat.

pasteurellosis

A nonspecific term used to dignify an infection (regardless of species of organism being infected) by the genus Pasteurella (regardless of the species infecting).

pas·teur·el·lo·sis

(pas'tūr-e-lō'sis)
Infection with bacteria of the genus Pasteurella.

Pasteurellosis

A bacterial infection caused by Pasteurella multocida. Pasteurellosis is characterized by inflammation around the wound site and may be accompanied by bacteria in the bloodstream and infection in tissues and organs.

Pasteur,

Louis, French chemist and bacteriologist, 1822-1895.
Pasteurella
Pasteurella aerogenes - species found in swine that can cause human wound infections following a pig bit.
Pasteurella multocida - bacterial species associated with dogs and cats.
Pasteurella pestis - Synonym(s): Yersinia pseudotuberculosis
Pasteurella "SP" - a rarely encountered organism that can cause infection after a guinea pig bite
Pasteurella tularensis - Synonym(s): Francisella tularensis
Pasteur effect - the inhibition of fermentation by oxygen, first observed by Pasteur.
Pasteur pipette - a cotton-plugged, glass tube drawn out to a fine tip, used for the sterile transfer of small volumes of fluid.
Pasteur vaccine
pasteurellosis - infection with bacteria of Pasteurella.
pasteurization - bacteria destruction process.
pasteurizer - pasteurization apparatus.

pas·teur·el·lo·sis

(pas'tur-e-lō'sis)
Infection with bacteria of the genus Pasteurella.

pasteurellosis

infection with organisms of the genera Pasteurella and Mannheimia. In animals includes septicemic pasteurellosis, pneumonic pasteurellosis, both of cattle, snuffles in rabbits and pasteurellosis of swine, sheep and goats. The causative bacteria include Pasteurella multocida types A, B, C and D, and Mannheimiahaemolytica.

epidemic pasteurellosis
see hemorrhagic septicemia.
ovine, porcine and caprine pasteurellosis
the more common pneumonic disease is caused by Mannheimia haemolytica and the septicemic disease by Pasteurella trehalosi.
pneumonic pasteurellosis
the common pasteurellosis of cattle caused by Mannheimiahaemolytica and sometimes Pasteurella multocida type A. Characterized by acute bronchopneumonia with fever, dyspnea, abnormal breath sounds, weak cough, severe toxemia and death in 24 to 48 hours.
septicemic pasteurellosis
see hemorrhagic septicemia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Septic shock and necrotizing fasciitis due to invasive Pasteurellosis are rarely seen.
He points out that the cost of one severe outbreak of pasteurellosis equates to many years of vaccine use for the average flock.
Lambs are protected by the colostrum they receive from their mothers shortly after birth, but this only covers them for a limited time against pasteurellosis and the clostridial diseases like pulpy kidney, braxy, blackleg and tetanus.
After the deaths in 2010 when pasteurellosis was also cited as the cause of death, the Saiga Conservation Alliance wrote, "Although the deaths are currently being ascribed to pasteurellosis, the underlying trigger remains to be identified.
Then the cause of death of 926 individuals was pasteurellosis.
Veterinarians vaccinated 149,255 livestock against anthrax, pasteurellosis, blackleg, and contagious bovine pleuropneumonia.
Preliminary cause of death of saiga is pasteurellosis as it was in the last die-off of antelopes in Kazahkstan in 2012.
Moreover, July is the period when farmers usually vaccinate ruminants against anthrax, black leg, botulism, and pasteurellosis.
All pigs were allowed a 7 day period for adaptation and were vaccinated against pasteurellosis and hog cholera before data collection started.
Other infections thought to contribute to illness among livestock during the flooding included nonspecific pneumonia, pasteurellosis, contagious caprine pleuropneumonia, contagious pustular dermatitis, bluetongue, foot rot, and complications of mange (Field Mission of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, unpub.
Preliminary cause of death of animals is pasteurellosis.
Then the cause of death of 926 saiga was pasteurellosis.