passivism


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pas·siv·ism

(pas'iv-izm),
1. An attitude of submission.
See also: pathic.
2. A sexual practice in which the subject is submissive to the will of the partner in behavior that usually requires the consent of both participants (for example, anal intercourse).
See also: pathic.
[see passive]

pas·siv·ism

(pas'iv-izm)
An attitude of submission, particularly in sexual relations.
See also: passive

passivism

(păs′ĭ-vĭzm) [″ + Gr. -ismos, condition]
1. Passive behavior or character.
2. Sexual perversion with subjugation of the will to another.

Patient discussion about passivism

Q. what is a passive smoking? and is it dangerous as an active?

A. Passive smoking is the exposure to cigarettes smoke emitted from cigarettes smoke by other person. It's dangerous and may increase the risk to several diseases similar to active smoking (one's exposure to smoke emitted from the cigarettes he or she is smoking) although the risk is of lower magnitude. Example for passive smoking is children of smokers etc.

You may read more here:http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

Q. what is it a passive smoking? and is it bad as as the active smoking? can i get cancer from it?

A. Passive smoking is the involuntary exposure of nonsmokers to tobacco smoke from the smoking of others. It is considered dangerous, and cause increased risk of cancer, although to a lesser degree than active smoking.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

Q. Can I get lung cancer from passive smoking? All my friends smoke, can I get cancer by hanging out with them?

A. Yes, you can develop cancer by passive smoking. From what I've heard, non-smokers exposed to second-hand smoke at home or work, increase their risk of developing lung cancer by 20 percent to 30 percent.

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References in periodicals archive ?
It is also true that the caseload of the Supreme Court and the absence of discretion on the part of the Supreme Court to choose what appeals it will hear have contributed to judicial passivism.
234) Professor Yasuo Hasebe also points out that, in addition to the existence of the Cabinet Legislation Bureau, the peculiar staffing of the Ministry of Justice may have contributed to judicial passivism.
238) The fact that the Constitution has not been regarded as law to be applied by judges is the most unfortunate reason for judicial passivism.
The most disturbing factor behind judicial passivism has been the failure of many judges to treat the Constitution as law to be enforced by the courts.
Yet, is the introduction of a Constitutional Court capable of overcoming judicial passivism in Japan?
There is also some truth to the view that such passivism has given the Diet an excuse for avoiding legislative action.
34) Rather than losing the religious nationalists to haredi humrot and passivism, Liebman notes the growing usage of the term haredile'umi ("nationalist haredi"), and its transformation over the last decade from a term of derogation to one borne with pride.
The Xu Xiyou ji thus promotes a kind of radical passivism, and in this it is unique in the tradition.
administration, even in justice; accumulation of depraved state of collective mind- no confidence of citizens in the democratic state institutions, passivism but also social explosions.
Orobator develops "three case studies" from Nigeria, Kenya, and South Africa (76-106), moving from "social passivism and numbing resignation" (87) in Nigeria to increasing action from Kenya to South Africa.
To be precise, Japanese constitutional scholars rarely refer to the Japanese Supreme Court as being "hoshuteki," which is the literal and strict translation of the term "conservative"; rather, as is most often the case, these scholars criticize the Court for its perceived "judicial passivity," specifically arguing that the Court is seemingly embracing "shihoushoukyokushugi," or "judicial passivism.
Ackerman is aware of these differences, and he does not argue that economics or judicial passivism per se underlay decisions like Brown, Escobedo, and Griswold.