passive smoke


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Related to passive smoke: Environmental Tobacco Smoke

passive smoke

pas·sive smoke

(pasiv smōk)
Cigarette, cigar, or pipe smoke inhaled unintentionally by non-smokers. May have negative health implications if inhaled over a long period of time. Also called second-hand smoke.

Patient discussion about passive smoke

Q. what is a passive smoking? and is it dangerous as an active?

A. Passive smoking is the exposure to cigarettes smoke emitted from cigarettes smoke by other person. It's dangerous and may increase the risk to several diseases similar to active smoking (one's exposure to smoke emitted from the cigarettes he or she is smoking) although the risk is of lower magnitude. Example for passive smoking is children of smokers etc.

You may read more here:http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

Q. Can I get lung cancer from passive smoking? All my friends smoke, can I get cancer by hanging out with them?

A. Yes, you can develop cancer by passive smoking. From what I've heard, non-smokers exposed to second-hand smoke at home or work, increase their risk of developing lung cancer by 20 percent to 30 percent.

Q. what is it a passive smoking? and is it bad as as the active smoking? can i get cancer from it?

A. Passive smoking is the involuntary exposure of nonsmokers to tobacco smoke from the smoking of others. It is considered dangerous, and cause increased risk of cancer, although to a lesser degree than active smoking.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/secondhandsmoke.html

More discussions about passive smoke
References in periodicals archive ?
As evident from figure 2, there is a significant association between participants' level of education and their reporting of having knowledge regarding passive smoke hazards.
Childhood passive smoke exposure was overall a much stronger risk factor for COPD and COPD-related symptoms than adulthood passive smoke exposure in this study population.
Reducing costs incurred by the government in caring for people admitted to local hospitals for conditions caused by passive smoke exposure, and a reduction in costs of employer liability insurance, are some of the benefits experienced by countries enforcing smoke-free laws.
Using data from 1,590 men and women of all ages, researchers found that smokers as well as nonsmokers exposed to passive smoke at home had lower levels of certain carotenoids (alpha-carotene, beta-carotene and cryptoxanthin) than nonsmokers in smokefree homes.
Laboratory studies of the effects of passive smoke on the body support the survey findings, Glantz said.
Passive smoke is additionally implicated in many thousands of deaths a year.
There is preliminary evidence of changes in the cardiovascular system of children exposed to passive smoke.
This latest study shows that babies exposed only to passive smoke after birth are twice as likely to die from SIDS than infants never exposed.
By contrast, Fontham's group did observe a pronounced dose-response relationship: Those women facing the greatest exposure to passive smoke also incurred the greatest risk of lung cancer.
Active and passive smoke exposure is a modifiable risk factor for breast cancer.
One doctor wrote, 'A 29-year-old woman has been exposed to high levels of passive smoke inhalation during the course of her occupation as a restaurant manager.