paroxysm


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Related to paroxysm: hysterical paroxysm

paroxysm

 [par´ok-sizm]
1. a sudden recurrence or intensification of symptoms.
2. a spasm or seizure. adj., adj paroxys´mal.

par·ox·ysm

(par'ok-sizm),
1. A sharp spasm or convulsion.
2. A sudden onset of a symptom or disease, especially one with recurrent manifestations such as the chills and rigor of malaria.
[G. paroxysmos, fr. paroxynō, to sharpen, irritate, fr. oxys, sharp]

paroxysm

/par·ox·ysm/ (par´ok-sizm)
1. a sudden recurrence or intensification of symptoms.
2. a spasm or seizure.paroxys´mal

paroxysm

(păr′ək-sĭz′əm)
n.
1. A sudden outburst of emotion or action: a paroxysm of laughter.
2.
a. A sudden attack, recurrence, or intensification of a disease.
b. A spasm or fit; a convulsion.

par′ox·ys′mal (-ək-sĭz′məl) adj.
par′ox·ys′mal·ly adv.

paroxysm

[per′əksiz′əm]
Etymology: Gk, paroxynein, to stimulate
1 a marked, usually episodic increase in symptoms.
2 a convulsion, fit, seizure, or spasm. paroxysmal, adj.

paroxysm

Medtalk A spasm or convulsion; a constellation of findings that signal a manifestation of disease, as in fever and shaking chills with malaria

par·ox·ysm

(par'ok-sizm)
1. A sharp spasm or convulsion.
2. A sudden onset of a symptom or disease, especially one with recurrent manifestations such as the chills and rigor of malaria.
[G. paroxysmos, fr. paroxynō, to sharpen, irritate, fr. oxys, sharp]

paroxysm

1. A sudden attack, such as a seizure, convulsion or spasm.
2. A sudden worsening of a disorder.

Paroxysm

A sudden attack of symptoms.
Mentioned in: Pheochromocytoma

paroxysm

spasm of severe pain, of sudden onset

par·ox·ysm

(par'ok-sizm)
1. Sharp spasm or convulsion.
2. Sudden onset of symptom or disease, especially one with recurrent manifestations.
[G. paroxysmos, fr. paroxynō, to sharpen, irritate, fr. oxys, sharp]

paroxysm (per´əksizəm),

n 1. an abrupt increase or repeated occurrence of symptoms.
n 2. a sudden violent attack, contraction of muscles, or convulsion.

paroxysm

1. a sudden recurrence or intensification of clinical signs.
2. a spasm or seizure.
References in classic literature ?
And it was presently punished as it deserved, by the most violent paroxysm that had seized the sufferer yet: the fight for breath became faster and more furious, and the former weapons of no more avail.
It was not in Dorothea's nature, for longer than the duration of a paroxysm, to sit in the narrow cell of her calamity, in the besotted misery of a consciousness that only sees another's lot as an accident of its own.
Da Souza would have called out, but a paroxysm of fear had seized him.
A whiff of the smoke from frying bacon would start him off for a half-hour's paroxysm, and he kept carefully to windward when Daylight was cooking.
And as they obeyed, Michael strained backward in a paroxysm of rage, making fierce short jumps to the end of the tether as he snarled and growled with utmost fierceness at the steward.
In the midst of the worst paroxysm Charlie came to leave a message from his mother, and was met by Phebe coming despondently downstairs with a mustard plaster that had brought no relief.
And after that another paroxysm of pain came on; and then his mind began to wander, and we feared his death was approaching: but an opiate was administered: his sufferings began to abate, he gradually became more composed, and at length sank into a kind of slumber.
Such words, you may imagine, strongly excited my curiosity; but the paroxysm of grief that had seized the stranger overcame his weakened powers, and many hours of repose and tranquil conversation were necessary to restore his composure.
I had merely announced to her my intention of keeping a man-servant, when she fell into the extraordinary paroxysm in which you found her.
It had been a more miserable day than usual; her father, after a visit of Wakem's had had a paroxysm of rage, in which for some trifling fault he had beaten the boy who served in the mill.
He sweated and perspired with such paroxysms and convulsions that not only he himself but all present thought his end had come.
But these paroxysms seldom occurred, and in them my big-hearted shipmate vented the bile which more calm-tempered individuals get rid of by a continual pettishness at trivial annoyances.