parotitis


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Related to parotitis: mumps

parotitis

 [par″o-ti´tis]
inflammation of the parotid gland.
contagious parotitis (epidemic parotitis) mumps.

par·o·ti·tis

(par'ō-tī'tis),
Inflammation of the parotid gland.
Synonym(s): parotiditis

parotitis

/par·oti·tis/ (par″o-ti´tis) inflammation of the parotid gland.
epidemic parotitis  mumps.

parotitis

(păr′ə-tī′tĭs) also

parotiditis

(pə-rŏt′ĭ-dī′tĭs)
n.
Inflammation of the parotid glands, as in mumps.

par′o·tit′ic (-tĭt′ĭk) adj.

parotitis

[per′ətī′tis]
Etymology: Gk, para + ous, ear, itis, inflammation
inflammation or infection of one or both parotid salivary glands. See also mumps.
enlarge picture
Parotitis

parotitis

ENT Inflammation of the parotid glands, a finding characteristic of mumps. See Mumps.

pa·rot·i·di·tis

(pă-rot'i-dī'tis)
Inflammation of the parotid gland.
Synonym(s): parotitis.

parotitis

Inflammation of the parotid glands, usually as a feature of MUMPS.

Parotitis

Inflammation and swelling of the salivary glands.
Mentioned in: Mumps

par·o·ti·tis

(parō-tītis)
Inflammation of parotid gland.

parotitis (per´ətī´tis),

n inflammation of the parotid gland. See also mumps.
parotitis, endemic,
n an acute viral infection characterized by unilateral or bilateral swelling of the salivary glands, especially the parotid.
parotitis, epidemic,
n See parotitis, endemic.
parotitis, infectious,
n See parotitis, endemic.

parotiditis, parotitis

inflammation of the parotid gland.

contagious parotiditis, epidemic parotiditis
mumps; an acute, communicable viral disease of humans involving chiefly the parotid gland, but frequently affecting other oral glands or the pancreas or gonads. There are sporadic reports of the infection occurring in dogs.
References in periodicals archive ?
While the latter is certainly curative, all open surgical procedures are associated with a significant risk of facial nerve injury, especially in the context of recurrent episodes of parotitis, with resultant fibrosis of the gland.
If mumps is suspected as the cause of parotitis, a buccal or nasopharyngeal swab should be submitted for mumps virus PCR testing.
had received 2 documented doses of MMR vaccine, had no contraindications for vaccination, had no history of mumps, and 5 days had not yet elapsed since onset of parotitis in the household index case-patient) were offered a third dose of MMR vaccine.
A probable case was defined as an individual with unilateral or bilateral parotitis lasting longer than 2 days without another apparent cause.
Hemolytic Streptococcus Henoch-Schoenlein Purpura Streptococcus viridans Systemic Lupus Streptococcus pneumoniae Erythematosus Streptococcus zooepidemicus Membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis Staphylococcus epidermidis IgA nephropathy Staphylococcus aureus Wegener granulomatosis Brucella meningococcal Polyarteritis nodosa Leptospira corynebacterium Others Mycoplasma Medications Viral Toxins Varicella Antivenin Rubella Vaccines Cytomegalovirus Endogenous antigens Hepatitis A, B, and C Thyroglobulin Epstein-Bar Virus Organo-gold compounds Parvovirus B19 Measles Parotitis Enterovirus Parasitic Toxoplasma gondii Rickettsia Plasmodium malariae and falciparum Filaria Trichinella Fungical Coccidiodes immitis
Recurrent parotitis (RP) is defined as recurrent parotid inflammation, generally associated with non-obstructive sialectasis of the parotid gland.
Angioedema, acute allergic reaction and parotitis should be considered in differential diagnosis.
Following an incubation period of 16 to 18 days, onset of illness is commonly nonspecific (such as fever, headache, malaise, myalgia, and anorexia), and 30% to 40% of infections in unvaccinated persons result in typical parotitis (AAP, 2006c; CDC, 2007c).
By contrast, workers with measles should be excluded from the ambulatory facility until 7 days after the onset of the measles rash, workers with rubella should be excluded from the facility until 5 days from the onset of rash, and workers with mumps should be excluded from the facility until 5 days after the onset of parotitis.
Less commonly, the bacterium can seed into the bloodstream because of parotitis, sinusitis, mastoiditis, otitis and dental infections (13).
Particularly vexing was the presence of cases without the classical presentation of parotitis and the inability to rule out cases based on negative laboratory results, said Dr.