parkinsonism


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Related to parkinsonism: Parkinson's disease

parkinsonism

 [pahr´kin-sun-izm]
any disorder manifesting the symptoms of parkinson's disease or any such symptom complex occurring secondarily to another disorder, such as encephalitis, cerebral arteriosclerosis, poisoning with certain toxins, and neurosyphilis.

par·kin·son·ism

(par'kin-son-izm),
1. A neurologic syndrome usually resulting from deficiency of the neurotransmitter dopamine as the consequence of degenerative, vascular, or inflammatory changes in the basal ganglia; characterized by rhythmic muscular tremors, rigidity of movement, festination, droopy posture, and masklike facies. Synonym(s): Parkinson disease, shaking palsy, trembling palsy
2. A syndrome similar to parkinsonism. Some features seen with Parkinson disease that occur with other disorders (for example, progressive supranuclear palsy) or as a side effect of certain medications (for example, antipsychotic drugs).
[J. Parkinson]

parkinsonism

/par·kin·son·ism/ (pahr´kin-son-izm″) a group of neurological disorders marked by hypokinesia, tremor, and muscular rigidity; see parkinsonian syndrome, under syndrome, and Parkinson's disease, under disease. parkinson´ian

parkinsonism

or

Parkinsonism

(pär′kĭn-sə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1. A syndrome characterized by tremor, muscular rigidity, slowness of movement, and postural and balance abnormalities, caused by Parkinson's disease or other diseases or induced by trauma, infection, or a drug. Also called Parkinson's syndrome.
2. Parkinson's disease.

par′kin·so′ni·an (-sō′nē-ən) adj.

parkinsonism

[pär′kənsəniz′əm]
Etymology: James Parkinson
a neurological disorder characterized by tremor, muscle rigidity, hypokinesia, a slow shuffling gait, and difficulty in chewing, swallowing, and speaking and caused by various lesions in the extrapyramidal motor system. Signs and symptoms of parkinsonism resemble those of idiopathic Parkinson's disease and may develop during or after acute encephalitis and in syphilis, malaria, poliomyelitis, and carbon monoxide poisoning. Parkinsonism may occur in patients treated with antipsychotic drugs. Also called shaking palsy. See also Parkinson's disease.

par·kin·son·ism

(pahr'kin-sŏn-izm)
1. A neurologic syndrome usually resulting from deficiency of the neurotransmitter dopamine as the consequence of degenerative, vascular, or inflammatory changes in the basal ganglia; characterized by rhythmic muscular tremors, rigidity of movement, festination, droopy posture, and masklike facies.
Synonym(s): Parkinson disease.
2. A syndrome similar to parkinsonism appearing as an adverse effect of some antipsychotic drugs.
[J. Parkinson]

Parkinsonism

An obsolescent term for PARKINSON'S DISEASE of known causation.

Parkinsonism

A set of symptoms originally associated with Parkinson disease that can occur as side effects of neuroleptic medications. The symptoms include trembling of the fingers or hands, a shuffling gait, and tight or rigid muscles.

disease

pathogenic entity characterized by an identifiable aetiological agent, group of signs and symptoms and/or consistent anatomical alterations; see syndrome
Parkinson's disease; parkinsonism; paralysis agitans; shaking palsy neurological syndrome of unknown cause associated with degenerative changes of basal ganglia (loss of pars compacta cells within the substantia nigra, the appearance of eosinophilic inclusion bodies [Lewy bodies] and decreased dopamine levels); affects 1% of older people; also associated with long-term head trauma (i.e. so-called 'punch-drunk' syndrome of boxers) or certain antipsychotic drugs (e.g. perazine, phenothiazines, butyrophenones and depot preparations); characterized by insidious onset of rhythmical muscular tremors at rest (pill-rolling tremor; 4-6 Hz), paucity and slowness of movement (hypokinesia, bradykinesia) and generalized rigidity (cogwheel and lead-pipe rigidity), festinant gait, stooped posture, mask-like facies and eventual progressive dementia

par·kin·son·ism

(pahr'kin-sŏn-izm)
Neurologic syndrome usually resulting from deficiency of neurotransmitter dopamine as consequence of degenerative, vascular, or inflammatory changes in basal ganglia; characterized by rhythmic muscular tremors, rigidity of movement, festination, droopy posture, and masklike facies.
Synonym(s): Parkinson disease.
[J. Parkinson]

parkinsonism,

n an array of symptoms including stiffness, slow or restricted body movements, tremor, or postural problems. It has many causes, including Parkinson's disease.

Patient discussion about parkinsonism

Q. What to expect from a Parkinson's patient? My 70 year old father has been diagnosed with Parkinson's. What will he be like from now on, what to expect?

A. Some of the symptoms of Parkinson's disease are:
• Trembling of hands, arms, legs, jaw and face
• Stiffness of the arms, legs and trunk
• Slowness of movement
• Poor balance and coordination
The symptoms usually get worse with time and then people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking or doing simple tasks.

Q. what is the latest on parkinson?

A. the "National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke" keeps an article on "what's new in Parkinson research" and they update it every now and then. i have to say that the last one is from 2005, but it has some interesting things you might wanna know...:

http://www.ninds.nih.gov/disorders/parkinsons_disease/parkinsons_research.htm

and the "National Parkinson Foundation" also keeps their readers updated and have a jornal you may find useful things in:

http://www.parkinson.org/NETCOMMUNITY/Page.aspx?pid=246&srcid=201

Q. How do you tell between temporal shaky hands and parkinson disease? My dear granpa's hands are being a bit shaky lately. I was wondering if I should worry about Parkinson's disease or is it most likely to be something else? How to tell? are there other symptoms for Parkinson's?? Any help...

A. The tremor (shaking body parts) of Parkinson disease appears during rest of the limb and disappears or weakens during active movement. Additionally, Parkinson's disease cause walking problems and slow movements.

You may read more here:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/parkinsonsdisease.html

More discussions about parkinsonism
References in periodicals archive ?
Those with parkinsonism had a mean age of 48 years, with a mean total exposure of 26,800 hours.
We also repeated the primary analysis after including cases of atypical parkinsonism in our case group.
Probable' MSA requires the presence of autonomic failure, a poor response to the drug L-dopa, and either the presence of Parkinsonism or cerebellar ataxia.
Fever (temperature [greater than or equal to] 38[degrees]C) 29 (91) 0 Nausea (with or without vomiting) 26 (81) 0 Headache 28 (88) 5 (19) Altered mental status 16 (50) 0 Meningismus 10 (31) 0 Rash 4 (13) 0 WNV-associated neurologic features * Tremor 21 (66) 8 (25) Myoclonus 15 (47) 2 (6) Parkinsonism 8 (25) 2 (6) Cerebellar ataxia 3 (9) 2 (6) Limb atrophy 0 17 (53) 1-y followup, Sign/symptom N = 22, no.
9-12) One point worth noting is that some movements associated with parkinsonism can be confused with movements associated with TD.
All women were followed through the onset of parkinsonism or Parkinson's disease, death, loss to follow-up, or the end of the study, whichever came first.
After six months, all were injected with the neurotoxin MPTP to induce symptoms of Parkinsonism.
In 1969, neurologist Oliver Sacks discovered a seemingly miraculous treatment for patients suffering from a rare and especially debilitating form of parkinsonism that was thought to have been triggered by a viral epidemic shortly after World War I.
Psychiatrists and those who believe their mendacities claim that mental illnesses are brain diseases, on a par with neurological diseases, such as Parkinsonism and stroke.
Damage to these cells through ecstasy use - and natural decline through ageing - could result in Parkinsonism, a degenerative disease causing trembling hands and slower movements.
The results are now in from a controversial clinical trial involving the injection of cells obtained from aborted fetuses into the brains of persons suffering from Parkinsonism (NEJM 344, no.
9] Olanzapine also produces less EPS than haloperidol, but treatment-emergent parkinsonism has been known to occur with olanzapine (12.