parietooccipital

pa·ri·e·to·oc·cip·i·tal

(pă-rī'ĕ-tō-ok-sip'i-tăl),
Relating to the parietal and occipital bones or to the parts of the cerebral cortex corresponding thereto.

parietooccipital

/pa·ri·e·to·oc·cip·i·tal/ (-ok-sip´ĭ-t'l) pertaining to the parietal and occipital bones or lobes.

parietooccipital

[pərī′ətō·oksip′itəl]
Etymology: L, paries + occiput, back of the head
pertaining to the parietal and occipital bones or cerebral lobes.

pa·ri·e·to·oc·cip·i·tal

(pă-rī'ĕ-tō-ok-sip'i-tăl)
Relating to the parietal and occipital bones or to the parts of the cerebral cortex corresponding thereto.
References in periodicals archive ?
A contrast-enhanced cranial computed tomography (CT) scan showed 2 lesions (3-4-mm) with rim enhancement and perifocal edema at the right occipital and left parietooccipital lobes.
On electroencephelogram (EEG), slow wave discharges arising from the parietooccipital region were observed in both hemispheres.
Computed tomography (CT) findings are described as single or multiple confluent hypodense lesions without mass effect, most commonly in the parietooccipital white matter.
Ragel et al (47) described a 59-year-old man with a 6-month history of confusion and headaches; MRI revealed a left parietooccipital lesion extending to the splenium of the corpus callosum.
Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a single cystic lesion in the right occipital and left parietooccipital regions of the brain.
The most characteristic imaging pattern in PRES is the presence of edema involving the white matter of the posterior portions of both cerebral hemispheres, especially the parietooccipital regions, in a relatively symmetric pattern that spares the calcarine and paramedian parts of the occipital lobes.
Computed tomography (CT) scans show vasogenic edema predominantly of the parietooccipital subcortical white matter, but involvement of the brain stem, cerebellum, frontal lobes, and basal ganglia are possible as well (Puppala & Hourihan, 2005).
5-cm, well-circumscribed, dark brown subdural nodule overlying the left parietooccipital region of the brain.
Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) is the term collectively used to include clots not only of the sagittal sinus but also of the cavernous sinus and parietooccipital regions.
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed bilateral areas of increased signal intensity located in the parietooccipital region extending to the frontal, temporal, and pons regions and associated with cerebral edema.
His cranial SPECT analysis at age 66-months with a two-week medication-free period revealed nonperfusion in the right inferior temporal and frontal lobes and in the right parietooccipital and left middle frontal regions as well as massive hypoperfusion in the right middle frontal region (Figure 3).