parietal

(redirected from parietals)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

parietal

 [pah-ri´ĕ-t'l]
1. of or pertaining to the walls of an organ or cavity.
2. pertaining to or located near the parietal bone. See anatomic Table of Bones in the Appendices.

pa·ri·e·tal

(pă-rī'ĕ-tăl),
1. Relating to the wall of any cavity.
2. Synonym(s): somatic (1)
3. Synonym(s): somatic (2)
4. Relating to the parietal bone.

parietal

/pa·ri·e·tal/ (pah-ri´ĕ-t'l)
1. of or pertaining to the walls of a cavity.
2. pertaining to or located near the parietal bone.

parietal

(pə-rī′ĭ-təl)
adj.
1. Relating to or forming the wall of a body part, organ, or cavity.
2. Of or relating to either of the parietal bones.
3. Botany Borne on the inside of the ovary wall. Used of the ovules or placentas in flowering plants.
n.
A parietal part, such as a wall or bone.

parietal

[pərī′ətəl]
Etymology: L, paries, wall
1 pertaining to the outer wall of a cavity or organ.
2 pertaining to the parietal bone of the skull or the parietal lobe of the cerebrum.

parietal

adjective Referring to the wall of an organ or cavity.

pa·ri·e·tal

(pă-rī'ĕ-tăl)
1. Relating to the wall of any cavity.
2. Synonym(s): somatic (1) .
3. Synonym(s): somatic (2) .
4. Relating to the parietal bone.

parietal

Pertaining to the wall or outer surface of a part of the body. From Latin parietem , a wall or partition.

parietal

  1. (of plant organs) joined to a wall, as in parietal ovules attached to the wall of the ovary.
  2. 2 of or relating to the bones of the top of the skull, which have a membranous structure and lie behind the frontal bones.
  3. 3 (of coelomic lining) covering the body wall as distinct from visceral organs (See also OXYNTIC CELL).

parietal

1. of or pertaining to the walls of an organ or cavity.
2. pertaining to or located near the parietal bone.

parietal block
abnormal electrical conduction through the left branch of the bundle of His.
parietal bone
one of two quadrilateral bones forming the sides and roof of the cranium. See Table 10.
parietal cells
cells of the proper gastric mucosa that secrete hydrochloric acid. Called also oxyntic cells.
parietal decidua
see parietal decidua.
parietal hernia
when only the antimesenteric edge of the intestine is incarcerated in the defect of body wall or mesentery.
parietal lobe
the upper central portion of the cerebral hemisphere, between the frontal and occipital lobes, and above the temporal lobe. In the human brain, it is the receptive area for fine sensory stimuli, and the highest integration and coordination of sensory information is carried on in this area. Damage to the parietal lobe can produce defects in vision and aphasia.
parietal peritoneum, parietal pleura
that part of the serous membrane that invests the wall of the cavity, as distinct from the visceral part.
References in periodicals archive ?
the frontal, jugal, postorbital, parietal, premaxilla, and prefrontal (Figure 3), followed by the palatine and quadratojugal in stage 19, and lastly by the vomer in stage 25 (Figure 3).
In stage 22 the frontal proceeds in the direction of the rostral edge of the parietal, medially approaching its contralateral opposite and the caudal edge of the prefrontal.
In stage 25, the frontal approaches the prefrontal, while the jugal approaches the postorbital, maxilla, quadratojugal and the parietal.
The sequence of ossification, according to Rieppel (1993), is: postorbital > parietal > prefrontal = frontal, while for Sheil and Greenbaum (2005) it is: prefrontal > frontal = postorbital > parietal.
The bones of the dermatocranium and the mandible are the first to begin the ossification process: squamosal, pterygoid, maxilla, dentary, coronoid, supra-angular and branchial horn I in stage 16, the frontal, jugal, postorbital, parietal, premaxilla and prefrontal in stage 17, and the palatine and quadratojugal in stage 19.
2) Another kind of periosteal reaction, represented by proliferative periostitis, was superimposed on the outer table of the occipital and parietal bones.
6) Finally, a slightly depressed transverse sulcus crossed the upper part of the right parietal bone, parallel to the coronal suture, measuring about 5 mm (Figure 7).
The same continued compression had an indirect effect on the skull bones, forcing the free parts to bend, especially the parietal and upper occipital bones.
We have also to consider that from birth to the ninth month of age, the baby's parietal bones normally have the most active growth period and the more accentuated bending, producing even a bilobal appearance in adults.
The parietal ring is immaculate, pale yellowish white, with no darker dusting along the supracephalic scale sutures.