paresthesia


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Related to paresthesia: Peripheral neuropathy

paresthesia

 [par″es-the´zhah]
a morbid or abnormal sensation, such as burning, prickling, or formication.
postoperative paresthesia prolonged paresthesia after surgery done with a local anesthetic, especially around the mouth due to injury of the mental nerve or mandibular nerve.

par·es·the·si·a

(par'es-thē'zē-ă), Avoid the jargonistic use of the plural of this abstract noun to mean 'episodes or zones of paresthesia'.
A spontaneous abnormal usually nonpainful sensation (for example, burning, pricking); may be due to lesions of both the central and peripheral nervous systems.
Synonym(s): paraesthesia
[para- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]

paresthesia

/par·es·the·sia/ (par″es-the´zhah) morbid or perverted sensation; an abnormal sensation, as burning, prickling, formication, etc.

paresthesia

also

paraesthesia

(păr′ĭs-thē′zhə)
n.
A skin sensation, such as burning, prickling, itching, or tingling, with no apparent physical cause.

par′es·thet′ic (-thĕt′ĭk) adj.

paresthesia

[per′esthē′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, para + erethizein, to excite
any subjective sensation, experienced as numbness, tingling, or a "pins and needles" feeling. Paresthesias often fluctuate according to such influences as posture, activity, rest, edema, congestion, or underlying disease. When experienced in the extremities, it is sometimes identified as acroparesthesia. Also spelled paraesthesia. See also acanthesia.

paresthesia

Neurology An abnormal tactile sensation, described as burning, pricking, tickling, tingling, or creeping, which indicates nerve irritation

par·es·the·si·a

(par'es-thē'zē-ă)
A subjective report of any abnormal sensation; could be experienced as numbness, tingling, or what is colloquially called "pins and needles."
Synonym(s): paraesthesia.
[para- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]

Paresthesia

An altered sensation often described as burning, tingling, or pin pricks.
Mentioned in: Gulf War Syndrome

par·es·the·si·a

(par'es-thē'zē-ă) Avoid the jargonistic use of the plural of this abstract noun to mean 'episodes or zones of paresthesia.'
In dentistry, a temporary or permanent condition of prolonged numbness after effects of an injected local anesthetic have ceased; maybe caused by trauma to nerve sheath during injection, hemorrhage about that sheath, or administration of contaminated anesthetic.
Synonym(s): paraesthesia.
[para- + G. aisthēsis, sensation]

paresthesia (per´esthē´zēə, -zhə),

n an altered sensation reported by the patient in an area where the sensory nerve has been afflicted by a disease or an injury. The patient may report burning, prickling, formication, or other sensations.
paresthesia, oral,
n a numbness or tingling that occurs in the mucosa or tissues of the oral cavity. It may be caused by a deficiency in vitamin B12 (cobalamine), trauma from surgery, or local anesthesia. It may be temporary, but in some cases it can be prolonged or permanent.

paresthesia

morbid or perverted sensation; an abnormal sensation, as burning, prickling, formication, etc. Difficult to define in animals because of its subjectivity. Sensations which give rise to itching or rubbing in animals are probably best classified as pruritus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Symptoms of UTS, which is much less common than CTS, include pain in the wrist and hand that is associated with paresthesia or numbness in the small finger and ulnar half of the ring finger.
For some patients, the stimulation sensation can fluctuate with changes in body position and paresthesia may become uncomfortable.
Patients with dysmenorrhea, sicca symptoms, subjective swelling, increased urinary frequency, shortness of breath, headache, constipation, paresthesia, cognitive dysfunction, arthralgia, tiredness, morning stiffness, depression, or anxiety had significantly higher TPCs than did those patients not suffering from any of these symptoms or conditions.
No patient in the two groups initially had facial paresthesia or hypotension and other symptoms such as vertigo and blurred vision.
10,11) Eliciting paresthesia becomes extremely unreliable in the event of trauma to the brachial plexus, and in the presence of extensive nerve damage due to electrocution, it may be difficult to elicit a twitch response using the nerve stimulation technique, with apparent conduction of the electrical impulse potentially blocked or attenuated at multiple levels.
Conclusion: The use of nerve locator is more effective and successful in performing peripheral nerve blocks in comparison to paresthesia elicitation technique.
Several sufferers also report a paresthesia or numbness.
Sensitive symptoms as well as paresthesia and hyperesthesia may be present.
The lesion is almost always seen during the first three decades of life, usually presenting with increasing pain, diminished sensation or paresthesia associated with a gradually enlarging mass causing compression neuropathy (1).
The constituting symptoms of vasomotor, paresthesia, insomnia, nervousness, melancholia, vertigo, fatigue and rheumatic pain were significantly improved in the EstroG-100 group in comparison with the placebo group (p < 0.
extremity paresthesia, arthralgia, myalgia, malaise, pruritus, headache, dizziness, metallic taste, visual disturbance, circumoral paresthesia, temperature reversal, or toothache) or systemic symptoms (e.
Neurological examination revealed paresthesia on the dorsum of the foot, the 2nd, 3rd, 4th digits, and one inch inferior to the medial malleolus.