parent ego state

parent ego state

(in transactional analysis) an ego state that incorporates the feelings and behavior learned from parents or other authority figures; a part of the self that offers advice like that of one's own parents, containing messages that emphasize what one "ought to" or "should not" do.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the functional analysis, the Parent ego state is divided into Critical Parent and Nurturing Parent, and the Child ego state is divided into Adapted Child and Natural Child; however, the Adult ego state remains the same.
2, the nurses primarily used the Nurturing Parent ego state (XSD=0.
The rescuer role is a manifestation of the nurturing parent ego state.
A parent ego state is characterized by an "I know better" attitude.
In the above example, the coach clearly is communicating out of a parent ego state as illustrated by his statements:
The Parent ego state is also discussed here as they describe the application of the TA model to group psychotherapy.
The Critical Parent is that part of the Parent ego state that is controlling, prohibitive, and may have non-rational attitudes.
For example, the person's internalized critical parent ego state can become "executive" at a particular moment and abuse his/her own children.
The Critical Parent ego state designates set of feelings, attitudes, and behavior patterns that resemble those of parental figures and represents that part of teacher's personality which criticizes, finds faults, and reflect the rules of the society (Berne, 1961).
On the other hand, since, Role theory asserts that behavior of a person is influenced by the role that she/he is playing it was hypothesized that teachers will be receive high scoring on Adult and Parent Ego States, whereas student will be described as child-like, irrespective of whether the person who gives the description is teacher or student.
Of note is White's explanation of the adult, child, and parent ego states, and how the interplay between these drive our lives.

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