parasitoid


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par·a·si·toid

(par'ă-sī'toyd),
Denoting a feeding relationship intermediate between predation and parasitism, in which the parasitoid eventually destroys its host; refers especially to parasitic wasps (order Hymenoptera) the larvae of which feed on and finally destroy a grub or other arthropod host stung by the mother wasp before laying its egg(s) on the host.
[parasite + G. eidos, appearance]

parasitoid

(păr′ə-sĭ-toid′, -sī′toid)
n.
An organism, usually an insect, that lives on or in a host organism during some period of its development and eventually kills its host.

par′a·sit·oid′ adj.

parasitoid

any of the alternately parasitic and free-living wasps and flies, such as the ichneumon fly, whose larvae parasitize and often kill members of the host species.
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References in periodicals archive ?
ANCIENT ORIGINS Scientists suspect that at least two different viruses independently developed symbiotic relationships with parasitoid wasps.
Host size, parasitoid density within a host and diet can all influence the biology of an adult parasitoid (Vinson & Iwantsch 1980).
SECTION 1: PARASITOID POLYDNAVIRUSES: EVOLUTION, GENOMICS, PROTEOMICS, BIOLOGICAL ROLES, AND BIOTECHNOLOGICAL IMPLEMENTATION
The objective of the current study is to identify a larval parasitoid of this species and to determine the size of parasitized colonies of P.
With the complete sequencing of these genomes, research also can identify the genes that determine which specific insects will be attacked by the parasitoid wasp, as well as the specific food needs of its offspring at large scale.
Dumbleton (1936) reported only one early parasitoid importation from Australia in 1922; it was later identified as Goniozus jacintae Farrugia (Bethylidae) (Berry 1998).
In that meeting it was identified that additional work on parasitoid genomics was needed.
The total number of each parasitoid species and their relative frequency in the examined samples are given in table 1.
In effect, Kathirithamby says, "the parasitoid hijacks the [host's] wound-repair system"
As the larva of the parasitoid hatches out of its egg, it consumes the contents of the insect or the egg in which it resides.