parapraxis


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parapraxis

 [par″ah-prak´sis] (pl. paraprax´es.)
a lapse of memory or mental error, such as a slip of the tongue or misplacement of an object, which, in psychoanalytic theory, is due to unconscious associations and motives; commonly called a “freudian slip.”

parapraxis

/para·prax·is/ (-prak´sis) pl. paraprax´es   a faulty action, as a slip of the tongue or misplacement of an object, which in psychoanalytic theory is due to unconscious associations and motives.

parapraxis

(păr′ə-prăk′sĭs)
n. pl. para·praxes (-prăk′sēz)
A minor error, such as a slip of the tongue, thought to reveal a repressed motive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Maybe parapraxis shows up those areas of life and of language about which we remain willfully stupid--it says, you know this but pretend not to.
Double parapraxes unlike single parapraxis seems to give way to utter incoherence, or perhaps it is just more volubly inventive.
Where parapraxis is concerned, I don't know if the slip is unconscious or only a pretense of unconsciousness.
Parapraxis and metalepsis meet at a threshold of distraction.
Just as dhvani works in collaboration with various figurative uses of language, instances of "full speech" in Freud are most often found in slips of the tongue, instances of parapraxis, homophony, metonymy and metaphor (in dreams), mistakes, errors, unintended puns.
What does this parapraxis reveal about the underlying structures and forces--the unconscious--shaping Spike Lee's film?
A second parapraxis in the film also revolves around a flashback sequence of an attack on the Little family by Klanlike vigilantes, this time the burning of the family's house in Lansing, Michigan, by the Black Legion, an event Malcolm X himself describes as "my earliest vivid memory" (Malcolm X, 1973, 3).
The cinematic parapraxis here lies in the apparently inappropriate juxtaposition of the family's traumatic experience of the assault on their lives with Louise's vaguely joking put-down of Earl.
To illustrate this idea, I will just mention one parapraxis that I round revealing.
In this light, Freud's confidence in having explicated his parapraxis "without raising any great difficulties" seems a product of misrecognition.
A footnote which Freud added to The Psychopathology of Everyday Life in 1924 is a preliminary clue: "It is not so rare an event for a parapraxis like losing or mislaying something to be undone by means of a dream -- by one's learning in the dream where the missing object is to be found" (1901, 237 n.