parapneumonic empyema

parapneumonic empyema

thoracic empyema occurring as a complication of pneumonia.
References in periodicals archive ?
Association of 2009 pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection and increased hospitalization with parapneumonic empyema in children in Utah.
1,2) Pediatric parapneumonic empyema (PPE), a rare complication of bacterial pneumonia in children, has been increasing globally due to nonvaccine serotype replacements of S pneumoniae, with serotype 19A most commonly discovered.
Recently a similar increase of parapneumonic empyema complicating bacterial pneumonia in 2005 was observed in children treated at the West Virginia University Children's Hospital (WVU-CH) in Morgantown, WV.
This study reviewed the medical records of childhood pneumonia complicated by parapneumonic empyema admitted to WVU-CH.
During the study period, 753 cases of pneumonia were identified in children at WVU-CH; 36 children were identified to be diagnosed with parapneumonic empyema (See Table 1).
Total cases of parapneumonic empyema in children 2000-2007
Thirty-six (36) cases of bacterial pneumonia complicated by parapneumonic empyema were identified.
Over an eight year period in Morgantown, West Virginia, thirty six (36) children with bacterial pneumonia complicated by parapneumonic empyema were treated at West Virginia University-Children's Hospital.
We hypothesize that deaths caused by parapneumonic empyema are increasing in Utah once again despite advances in critical care and the availability of antimicrobial drugs and new vaccines.
Parapneumonic empyema, a serious complication of bacterial pneumonia frequently caused by Streptococcus pneumonia and Staphylococcus aureus, is increasing in North and South America, Europe, and Asia (11-21).
Pediatric parapneumonic empyema (PPE) has been increasing in several countries including Spain.
An epidemiological investigation of a sustained high rate of pediatric parapneumonic empyema risk factors and microbiological associations.