paraphasia


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Related to paraphasia: echolalia, paraphrasing

paraphasia

 [par″ah-fa´zhah]
partial aphasia in which the patient uses wrong words, or uses words in wrong and senseless combinations. Called also paragrammatism, paraphemia, and paraphrasia.

par·a·pha·si·a

(par'ă-fā'zē-ă),
A form of aphasia in which a person has lost the ability to speak correctly, substituting one word for another and jumbling words and sentences unintelligibly.
See also: jargon.
[para- + G. phasis, speech]

paraphasia

/para·pha·sia/ (-fa´zhah) partial aphasia in which the patient employs wrong words, or uses words in wrong and senseless combinations (choreic p.) .

paraphasia

[-fā′zhə]
Etymology: Gk, para + phrasein, to utter
1 a condition in which a person hears and comprehends words but is unable to speak correctly. Incoherent words are substituted for intended words, thereby creating sentences that are unintelligible.
2 speech that is incoherent, unintelligible, and apparently incomprehensible but may be meaningful when carefully interpreted by a psychotherapist. Also called jargon aphasia, word salad.

paraphasia

The habitual substitution of inappropriate or meaningless words or jargonisms.

Paraphasias
• Literal paraphasia—Substitution of an inappropriate phoneme (syllable). 
• Verbal paraphasia—Substituion of a complete word; fluent paraphasic speech is termed jargon aphasia.
• Delirium (incoherency).

par·a·pha·si·a

(par'ă-fā'zē-ă)
A symptom of aphasia in which speech is fluent but incorrect due to word and sound substitutions.
See also: paragrammatism, receptive aphasia
[para- + G. phasis, speech]

paraphasia

A DYSPHASIA in which speech is fluent but often meaningless or irrelevant and contains incorrectly substituted words. This is a feature of Wernicke's dysphasia.
References in periodicals archive ?
An aphasia syndrome including reduction of speech output, anomia, and paraphasias but without repeating difficulty is attributed to the thalamus.
When repeating numbers, they tend to use verbal paraphasias (substituting a word with a related meaning); when repeating words, they tend to use literal paraphasias (interchanging similar syllables).
Some aphasics are liable to produce phonological paraphasias which bear a superficial resemblance to harmony patterns in child language.
This variability likens paraphasias to the slips of the tongue of normal adult speakers.
In all probability, it is a simple spin-off of the fact that the distance between the interactants in phonological paraphasias is so small.
Her mental status examination revealed that, her spontaneous speech was non-fluent with initiation hesitancy, word finding pauses, stuttering, phonemic paraphasias and grammatical word omissions.
However, a model in which the only link from the concept representations domain to the articulatory motor domain is a direct link (Figure 4, pathway 1-2) cannot account for observations that normal subjects exhibit phonological slips-of-the-tongue and aphasic subjects produce phonemic paraphasias in naming and spontaneous language, which are quite comparable with those produced during repetition.