paraovarian

par·o·var·i·an

(par'ō-var'ē-ăn),
1. Relating to the paroophoron.
2. Adjacent or in proximity to the ovary. Synonym(s): paraovarian

paraovarian

beside the ovary.

paraovarian cyst
remnants of mesonephric or paramesonephric ducts and tubules.
References in periodicals archive ?
Partial differential diagnosis of adnexal cystic/ solid masses by ultrasound in the nonpregnant patient * Physiologic ovarian cyst/follicle * Other ovarian cysts * Hemorrhagic cyst * Endometrioma * Tubo-ovarian abscess * Pyo/hydrosalpinx * Abdominal abscess * Paraovarian cyst * Dermoid cyst/Teratoma * Serous/mucinous cystadenoma or CA & other epithelium neoplasms * Fibromas/Thecomas * Ovarian mets * Ovarian torsion * Pedunculated fibroid * Peritoneal inclusion cysts Table 2.
Cysts related to the Mullerian system usually occur in paraovarian (1) or paratubal regions (2).
In the paratubal and paraovarian regions the majority of the cysts are of Mullerian origin and can account for up to 76% of all the cysts (3).
Kishimota et al suggested that most paraovarian cysts were homogenous, near the ipsilateral round ligament and uterus (9).
This is true of most dermoid cysts, endometriomas, corpus luteum cysts, hydrosalpinges and peritoneal pseudocysts, and of many paraovarian cysts and benign solid ovarian tumours, for example, fibromas, fibrothecomas, thecofibromas, and thecomas.
Total abdominal hysterectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy were performed and subsequently revealed giant cell arteritis involving numerous small arteries in the ovaries, fallopian tubes, paraovarian and paratubal soft tissues, myometrium, and cervix.
In addition, there was a widespread giant cell arteritis affecting numerous small arteries in the ovaries, fallopian tubes, paraovarian and paratubal soft tissues, myometrium, and cervix.
Peritoneal inclusion cysts should be differentiated from paraovarian cysts, hydrosalpinx, and low-grade cystic mesothelioma (2).
It is a common tumor of male paratesticular tissues (epididymis, tunica or spermatic cord) and has also been described in females (uterus, fallopian tube, ovary and paraovarian tissues).
Examples of such lesions that may be accurately diagnosed by MRI include peritoneal inclusion cysts (Figure 7), pedunculated fibroid cysts, paraovarian cysts, paratubal cysts, or lymphadenopathy.
Paraovarian cysts are benign lesions that arise from wolffian duct remnants and are usually seen along the broad ligament.
Sonographic diagnosis of paraovarian cysts: Value of detecting a separate ipsilateral ovary.