paranoid personality disorder


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paranoid

 [par´ah-noid]
resembling paranoia.
a person suffering from paranoia; called also paranoiac.
paranoid disorder older term for delusional disorder.
paranoid personality disorder a personality disorder in which the patient views other people as hostile, devious, and untrustworthy and reacts in a combative manner to disappointments or to events that he or she considers rebuffs or humiliations. Notable are a questioning of the loyalty of friends, the bearing of grudges, a tendency to read threatening meanings into benign remarks, and unfounded suspicions about the fidelity of a partner. Unlike delusional disorders or paranoid schizophrenia, in which delusional or hallucinatory persecution occurs, it is not characterized by psychosis.

par·a·noid per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

1. a personality disorder that is less debilitating than paranoid or delusional paranoid disorder; the essential feature is a pervasive and unwarranted tendency, beginning in early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, to misinterpret the actions of others as deliberately exploitive, harmful, demeaning, or threatening.
2. a DSM diagnosis that is established when the specified criteria are met.

paranoid personality disorder

n.
A personality disorder characterized by persistent distrust and suspicion of others, occurring independently of other disorders such as schizophrenia.

paranoid personality disorder

a psychiatric disorder characterized by extreme suspiciousness and distrust of others to the degree that one blames them for one's mistakes and failures and goes to abnormal lengths to validate prejudices, attitudes, or biases.

paranoid personality disorder

DSM 301.0 Psychiatry A pattern of pervasive distrust and suspiciousness of others such that their motives are interpreted as malevolent; PPD begins by early adulthood and is present in various contexts

par·a·noid per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

(pară-noyd pĕr'sŏ-nali-tē dis-ōrdĕr)
Disease less debilitating than paranoid or delusional paranoid disorder; essential feature is a pervasive and unwarranted tendency, beginning in early adulthood and present in a variety of contexts, to misinterpret the actions of others as deliberately exploitive or harmful.

par·a·noid per·son·al·i·ty dis·or·der

(pară-noyd pĕr-sŏ-nali-tē dis-ōrdĕr)
Personality disorder less debilitating than paranoid or delusional paranoid disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Psychiatrists make a distinction between the milder paranoid personality disorder described above and the more debilitating delusional (paranoid) disorder.
Cognitive intervention for a paranoid personality disorder.
Yesterday Porter, said to have a paranoid personality disorder, admitted common assault.
The most common diagnoses were antisocial personality disorder, seen in 43% of the sample, paranoid personality disorder, seen in 27% of the sample, and borderline personality disorder, seen in 24% of the sample.
The fresh evidence, not heard by the jury which convicted Martin because it was not gathered until after his trial, was yesterday the subject of a clash of professional opinion between experts as to whether the farmer was suffering from a paranoid personality disorder and therefore entitled to the defence of diminished responsibility.
Mr Wolkind called evidence from Dr Philip Joseph, consultant forensic psychiatrist at St Mary's Hospital, Paddington, west London, that Martin had a paranoid personality disorder of long-standing, leading to the conclusion that at the time of the killing he was suffering from abnormality of mind.
A paranoid personality disorder led him to think people were ganging up against him.
A judge ordered a psychological evaluation of the family, and Generosa was diagnosed with a paranoid personality disorder.
The evidence, not heard by the jury which convicted Martin because it was not gathered until after his trial, was the subject of a clash of opinion between experts as to whether the farmer was suffering from a paranoid personality disorder and therefore entitled to the defence of diminished responsibility.
Sentencing Hartshorne, of Hope Farm Road, Great Sutton, Cheshire, the judge said that psychiatric reports suggested she suffered from a paranoid personality disorder, although it was unlikely she would benefit from treatment.
The Appeal Court - ruling on a case that triggered nationwide debate on the householder's rights of self-defence - accepted new psychiatric evidence that Martin had a paranoid personality disorder.
Bentley - who has a paranoid personality disorder - pleaded not guilty to murder but guilty to manslaughter.