paraffin method

paraffin method

(in surgical pathology) a method used in preparing a selected portion of tissue for pathological examination. The tissue is fixed, dehydrated, and infiltrated by and embedded in paraffin, forming a block that is cut with a microtome into slices 8 μm thick. This method, which is more commonly used than the frozen section method, is slower and therefore not used during surgery.

paraffin method,

n a method used in preparing a selected portion of tissue for pathologic examination. The tissue is fixed, dehydrated, and infiltrated by and embedded in paraffin wax, forming a block that is cut with a microtome into slices 8 mm thick.
References in periodicals archive ?
At this point the apparent contradictions could not have been caused by artifacts associated with the paraffin method, as Carr and Carr (1970) suggested, since paraffin sectioning was not commonly used for botanical work until after 1881, when Butschli and Giesbrecht independently published papers promoting paraffin serial sectioning (Bracegirdle, 1978).
They noted that the epithelial cells are delicate and are difficult to successfully fix and embed, especially with paraffin embedding, and argued that published images of glands that had been processed for the paraffin method frequently show extensive mechanical damage.
Like Carr and Carr (1970), they concluded that the paraffin method leads to a false impression of lysigeny, and they suggest that all Rutaceae may be schizogenous.